40
40
Théodore Millet (1853-1904)

A French gilt-bronze mounted rosewood vitrine cabinet-on-stand, Paris, circa 1890
JUMP TO LOT
40
Théodore Millet (1853-1904)

A French gilt-bronze mounted rosewood vitrine cabinet-on-stand, Paris, circa 1890
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Vue sur la Riviera – La Villa d’un Collectionneur

|
Paris

Théodore Millet (1853-1904)

A French gilt-bronze mounted rosewood vitrine cabinet-on-stand, Paris, circa 1890
opening with one door, signed 'MILLET A PARIS' on the top of right front foot
Haut. 206 cm, larg. 85 cm, prof. 45 cm ; height 81 in., width 33 1/3  in., depth 17 3/4 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

A Private Collection, vol. 1, Sotheby's, New York, 26 October 2006, lot 166 (sold 228 000$)

Literature

D. Ledoux-Lebard, Le Mobilier Français du XIXe siècle, pp. 482-483

C. Payne, 19th Century European Furniture, p. 40

Catalogue Note

The design of this vitrine is undoubtedly strongly influenced by the celebrated sculptor and designer Léon Messagé. Based upon Messagé drawings for two vitrines, illustrated in Payne, Linke, pl. 75 and pl. 180, one might conclude that Théodore Millet either created this vitrine after seeing works which were the result of the collaboration of Zwiener and Messagé, or commissioned the design directly from the sculptor.

Léon Messagé, whose book of designs, Cahier des Dessins et Croquis Style Louis XV totaling thirty-six drawings for furniture, bronzes doré and silver, published in 1890 from his address at 40 rue Sedaine near the Faubourg St. Antoine, was most probably acting as a freelance artist collaborating closely with various different ébénistes Parisiens such as the celebrated cabinetmakers Zwiener, Roux et Brunet and Linke. His creative genius interpreted the Louis XV style of the mid-eighteenth century in a vigorous manner, cleverly adopting the asymmetric rocaille style popularized in the 1720s by Parisian designers such as Juste Aurèle Meissonier (1695-1750), as well as the classicism of the Louis XVI style. This was common enough practice under the Second Empire and in the later years of the 19th century alongside contemporaries such as Beurdeley, Charles Wincklesen, Dasson and Sormani. After making sketches, Messagé made a three-dimensional model of wax or plaster of the piece for client approval on a scale one-fifth the intended size of the finished piece. From the wax model a life-sized model in wood was made to ensure a precise fit of the bronze mounts. Records show that Messagé designed all the important items for Linke's booth at the Paris 1900 Exposition Universelle. The periodical review Art & Curiosité records that Message's projects were "nés sous le crayon se formèrent d'un jet plus rapide en la noble matière du bronze, ciselé d'une main sûre" (born from the pen, [the projects] were rapidly and accurately rendered into bronze, [and] chiseled by a firm hand) (October, 1904, p. 166).

Vue sur la Riviera – La Villa d’un Collectionneur

|
Paris