9
9
A pair of gilt-bronze mounted, Wedgwood Manufactured blue and white biscuit athéniennes pots-pourris, Louis XVI
Estimate
35,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT
9
A pair of gilt-bronze mounted, Wedgwood Manufactured blue and white biscuit athéniennes pots-pourris, Louis XVI
Estimate
35,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

La Collection Ribes I

|
Paris

A pair of gilt-bronze mounted, Wedgwood Manufactured blue and white biscuit athéniennes pots-pourris, Louis XVI
the pierced foliate upper section and cover with a pine cone finial within a blue and white biscuit disk with floral garlands, on fluted and foliate tripod stand with lambrequin frieze and foliate tassel to each side, on lion paw feet, the central twisted stem entwined by a snake, on a shaped white marble base, the biscuit signed Wedgwood 3; (one biscuit element broken and restored)
Quantity: 2
Haut. 45 cm, diam. 19 cm ; height 17¾in., diameter 7½in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

- Sale Collection Madame Duval, Me Doublot, Drouot, Paris, 28 November 1904, lot 51
- Sale Me Baudoin, Georges Petit Gallery, Paris, 14-15 June 1920, lot 152

Literature

- P. Verlet, La maison du XVIIIe siècle en France, Paris, 1966, p. 57 (ill.)

Catalogue Note

At the Salon of 1763, the artist Joseph-Marie Vien presented a painting entitled La vertueuse athénienne (The Virtuous Athenian) which is currently housed at the Museum of Fine Arts in Strasbourg. Jean-Henri Eberts used the title of this painting, previously signifying a woman carrying an offering, as a term to describe the tripod in his article for L'Avant-Coureur of 27 September 1773. Finding inspiration from amongst the tripods and braziers from Antiquity, this form was adapted for perfume burners of large size and works by carpenters (Nissim de Camondo Museum, Paris, inv. CAM 37.1 and 2), but also for smaller objects made by bronze artists and ciseleurs.

The pair presented here is distinguished by the richness of its decor such as the lion paw feet, the twisted central stem entwined by a threatening snake, the upper frieze with pendants centred with vine leaves and bordered by lace braided trimmings. The very rare use of blue and white Wedgwood biscuit plates with quarterfoil scrollwork and floral garlands, is also remarkable.

The Wedgwood factory which was founded in Staffordshire in 1759 by Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795), was soon favoured by a wealthy clientele. The British Royal Family placed orders and the manufactory exported throughout Europe. French decorative art dealers, especially under the reign of Louis XVI, did not hesitate to inset Wedgewood medallions and cartouches onto furniture or objects. Wedgewood’s decorative repertoire quickly integrated Neoclassicism as seen in the plates on the present pair of athéniennes pots-pourris.

La Collection Ribes I

|
Paris