494
494

PROPERTY FROM AN OLD HONG KONG COLLECTION

A BLUE-GROUND EMBROIDERED SILK 'DRAGON' ROBE, JIFU
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY
Estimate
120,000180,000
JUMP TO LOT
494

PROPERTY FROM AN OLD HONG KONG COLLECTION

A BLUE-GROUND EMBROIDERED SILK 'DRAGON' ROBE, JIFU
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY
Estimate
120,000180,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A BLUE-GROUND EMBROIDERED SILK 'DRAGON' ROBE, JIFU
QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY
vibrantly embroidered against a blue satin silk ground with nine dragons, one on the inner flap, interspersed with gold-couched shou medallions, all above lishui waves supporting the bajixiang emblems, all rendered with polychrome silks and couched with gold-wrapped silk threads
142.2 by 210.2 cm, 56 by 82 3/4  in.
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Literature

The strict sumptuary laws of the Qing dynasty promulgated in 1759 and enforced in 1766, required that the Mandarin civil and military officials wear robes covered in dragons and other symbols for all formal occasions appropriate to their positions. Created to represent the universe, the formal court robes display dragons chasing flaming pearls amidst cloud scrolls and other auspicious emblems, often above stripes representing waves and mountains. The shou medallions (eight on the back and eight on the front) on the current robe indicate that it was made to be worn on the occasion of an imperial birthday.

The role of the mandarin was not hereditary; it was based on merit and the passing of a very difficult series of imperial examinations which were open to all. Having succeeded in the imperial examinations a mandarin was entitled to wear the official court robes. In his official capacity and wearing the dragon robe, a mandarin then represented the authority of the Emperor and carried the power to institute the will of the Emperor and administer his laws and punishments.

Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong