Lot 1
  • 1

BHUPEN KHAKHAR | In the Room

Estimate
800,000 - 1,000,000 INR
Log in to view results
bidding is closed

Description

  • Bhupen Khakhar
  • In the Room
  • Signed in Gujarati and titled 'In the room' lower right
  • Watercolour on paper
  • 30.5 x 26.9 cm. (12 x 10 ½ in.)
  • Painted in 1979

Exhibited

Madrid, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Bhupen Khakhar, 6 June - 16 September 2002
Mumbai, The National Gallery of Modern Art, Bhupen Khakhar: A Retrospective, 4 - 26 November 2003

Literature

E. Juncosa, Bhupen Khakhar, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2002, illustration p. 104
U. Mirchandani, Bhupen Khakhar: A Retrospective, The Fine Art Resource, Mumbai, 2003, illustration p. 68 

Condition

Small spots of foxing and yellowing are visible throughout. A pin-hole sized depression to the surface is present along the upper right edge. Minor creases to the paper are also apparent, most notably on the head of the figure on the right and the hanging clothes. The reverse of the paper has not been examined as it is glued to the mount. The work is in good overall condition for its age, as viewed.
"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Catalogue Note

‘… watercolour has provided [Bhupen Khakhar] with a more playful and spontaneous kind of image-making... As a watercolourist he is free of the pressure of The Masterpiece (part of the inheritance of western oil painting) and closer to the popular artists of Indian tradition... In the seventies, Khakhar's watercolours were mostly of things seen - a still-life, a tree, a shrine, a single figure, or perhaps some vignette glimpsed from the bus or train. Unlike the oil paintings, they did not attempt to create some encompassing world.' (T. Hyman, Bhupen Khakhar, Chemould Publications and Arts, Bombay, 1998, p. 63)