126
126
A view of the Taj Mahal from the west looking east, India, Company School, circa 1813
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
126
A view of the Taj Mahal from the west looking east, India, Company School, circa 1813
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World including Fine Rugs and Carpets

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London

A view of the Taj Mahal from the west looking east, India, Company School, circa 1813
watercolour on paper, watermarked 'J.Whatman', dated 1813
58 by 79.5cm.
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Provenance

From the collection Sir Charles Barry (1795-1860), architect of the Houses of Parliament, thence by decent.

Sir Charles Barry, (1795-1860) was the architect of the Houses of Parliament. His son, Sir John, was a renown engineer, whose projects included the Tower of London. It is unclear when the drawing entered the collection of the Wolfe-Barry family, but it is likely that it was acquired in the first half of the nineteenth century, as these drawings were produced for a European audience.

Catalogue Note

This picture presents the Taj Mahal from the south-west corner terrace, providing a view across the front of the mausoleum towards the south-east corner tower. The subject concurrently exhibits the beauty and detail of the decoration along the mausoleum and the artist’s ability to execute the work in double-point perspective. In addition the perspective provides a good view of the alternating marble and sandstone slabs encircling the mausoleum.

The current example may be the only Agra draughtsman’s view of the Taj Mahal for which there might be a European prototype, that of the eccentric artist and indigo planter Thomas Loncroft, whose only surviving coloured drawing describes the mausoleum from the same south-west approach (now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, see E. Koch, The Complete Taj Mahal, London, 2006, fig.357). Longcroft arrived in India with his friend Johan Zoffany in 1783 and drew some of the Mughal monuments of Delhi and Agra in the 1780s and 1790s in meticulous detail, normally finished in wash. For a similar Agra draughtsman’s view, see M. Archer, Company drawings in the India Office Library, London, 1972, pl.62.

Arts of the Islamic World including Fine Rugs and Carpets

|
London