415
415

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE BELGIAN COLLECTION

Anto Carte
LE PAIN
JUMP TO LOT
415

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE BELGIAN COLLECTION

Anto Carte
LE PAIN
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Art Impressionniste et Moderne

|
Paris

Anto Carte
1886 - 1954
LE PAIN
signed anto carte (lower right)
oil on canvas
110 x 120,3 cm; 43 3/8 x 47 1/4 in.
Painted in 1921.
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Provenance

E. Gille, Theux
Sale: Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels, December 6, 2004, lot 80
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Leuven, Museum M, on loan in 2018

Literature

Albert Guislain,  Anto Carte, Antwerp, 1950, illustrated p. 52

Catalogue Note

As a humanist painter, primarily interested in the human condition, Anto Carte was part of the "Belgian Imagists" group alongside artists such as Valerius de Saedeleer or Gustave van de Woestyne with whom he exhibited in 1923 in Paris. painted in 1921, this painting is part of a cycle of works painted by Anto Carte after his encounter with Emile Verhaeren in Paris at the end of the 1910s.

The human figure is central to Anto Carte’s work. Whether he depicts peasants, laborers, miners, fishermen or acrobats, his art is a perpetual philosophical reflection on human destiny. The Belgian painter captured here a portrait of the human condition in this work of monumental austerity which throws the spectator into a deep introspective meditation.

The present painting reveals Anto Carte’s propensity for audacious compositions and the use of particularly innovative perspective and points of view. The precise drawings is characteristic of the work of this artist who became the founder of the Nervia group (1928-1938). Anto Carte’s technique involves a precise use of line which highlights the silhouettes against the background, thus giving rise here to a poignant expressivity. The daring presentation used here, with the sculptural and monumental figures in the foreground, the original perspective and the stylized volumes are particularly characteristic of the refinement of Anto Carte’s art which seems to endow this scene with a feeling of eternity.

Art Impressionniste et Moderne

|
Paris