63
63
Rockwell Kent
CRAIGBEEFIN
Estimate
70,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
63
Rockwell Kent
CRAIGBEEFIN
Estimate
70,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

American Art

|
New York

Rockwell Kent
1882 - 1971
CRAIGBEEFIN
signed Rockwell Kent and dated 1926-7 (lower right)
oil on panel
20 1/4 by 29 3/4 inches
(51.4 by 75.6 cm)
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

This painting will be included in the Annotated Checklist of Paintings by Rockwell Kent currently being prepared by Scott R. Ferris and Richard V. West.

Provenance

(possibly) Sold: Weschler’s, Washington, D.C., September 30, 1973, lot 1116
Donald Webster (possibly acquired at the above sale)
Matthew Gordon
Michael Gordon (by descent)
Brock & Co., Concord, Massachusetts
Acquired by the present owner from the above, 2008

Exhibited

New York, Wildenstein & Company, Important Exhibition of Paintings of Ireland and Elsewhere by Rockwell Kent (Paintings by Rockwell Kent), April-May 1927, no. 25, n.p.
New York, ACA Galleries, Rockwell Kent (1882-1971): Selected Works, 1989, n.p.

Literature

Christy Gillespie, “In Search of the ‘Missing’ Irish Kent Paintings” The Kent Collector, vol. XXXVI, Summer 2010, Plattsburgh, New York, no. 25, p. 14.

Catalogue Note

We are grateful to Scott R. Ferris and Richard V. West for preparing the following essay:

The paintings Rockwell Kent created while in Ireland can be categorized in two groups: one, the detailed landscape and human infused compositions such as Annie Mc Ginley (private collection) and Dan Ward’s Stack (The State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, Russia); and two, the stark, modeled landscapes that focus more on abstract form–such as in the work of Arthur Dove and Georgia O’Keeffe–that are more a human reflection on the essence of the world around us. Craigbeefin represents the latter.

Kent possessed the ability to render parallel universes: creating compositions that were representative–the realism that he claimed to adhere to–and the modernistic–expressing the intuitive versus what he physically viewed. This painting, like some of its predecessors, was a key to unlocking the doorway to his apex as a painter, as seen in his Greenland landscapes of the 1930s. 

A label on the verso identifies the ship, the SS Montnairn (Canadian Pacific Steamship Line), as the carrier of this painting from Ireland to Canada in September of 1926.

American Art

|
New York