523
523
A RARE AND WELL-MODELED PAINTED POTTERY FIGURE OF A LADY HOLDING A DOG
TANG DYNASTY
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 52,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
523
A RARE AND WELL-MODELED PAINTED POTTERY FIGURE OF A LADY HOLDING A DOG
TANG DYNASTY
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 52,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Noble Pursuit: Important Chinese and Korean Art from a Japanese Private Collection

|
New York

A RARE AND WELL-MODELED PAINTED POTTERY FIGURE OF A LADY HOLDING A DOG
TANG DYNASTY
standing in an elegant swaying pose with hands raised cradling a dog naturalistically modeled with incised fur, wearing long, heavy robes falling in deep folds to the base, the fully rounded features framed by the long hair drawn into an elaborate coiffure arranged in a dramatic crescent face and an asymmetrical twisted top knot, with traces of pigment, wood stand, Japanese wood box (4) 
Height 20 1/4  in., 51.4 cm 
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Catalogue Note

Sensitively fashioned with a plump face, small heart-shaped lips and the head slightly turned to one side, pottery figures with such voluptuous features are attributed to the first half of the 8th century, and in particular to the reign of Emperor Xuanzong (r. 712-756). The plump features of these figures, their long voluminous robes and flamboyant hairstyles are believed to be representative of the aesthetic trend led by the famous imperial concubine Yang Guifei (719-756), beloved consort of the Emperor. Her distinctive hairstyle, known as ‘duomaji’ 'falling off the horse bun', originated according to legend with the Emperor’s fascination with Yang Guifei’s appearance after she fell from a horse.

Ceramic figures of ladies-in-waiting holding small dogs are comparatively rare; a closely related example, possibly the pair to this piece, is illustrated in Sekai tōji zenshū/Ceramic Art of the World, vol. 11, Tokyo, 1976, col. pl. 29. See also a pottery figure of a lady holding a dog, but with hands exposed, in the collection of Julius Eberhardt, illustrated in Regina Krahl, Frühe Chinesische Kunst/Early Chinese Art, Hong Kong, 1999, vol. 1, pl. 130; and another with a different coiffure, from the collection of David W. Dewey, published in Celestial Horses and Long Sleeve Dancers, Minneapolis, 2013, p. 180 (right).

A Noble Pursuit: Important Chinese and Korean Art from a Japanese Private Collection

|
New York