522
522
A BLUE-GLAZED POTTERY JAR
TANG DYNASTY
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 32,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
522
A BLUE-GLAZED POTTERY JAR
TANG DYNASTY
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 32,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Noble Pursuit: Important Chinese and Korean Art from a Japanese Private Collection

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New York

A BLUE-GLAZED POTTERY JAR
TANG DYNASTY
the broad-shouldered body rising from a short spreading foot to a waisted neck with a rolled everted rim, covered overall in a vibrant blue glaze, applied in layers and pooling to deep indigo tones, the glaze extending over the rim and foot, stopping unevenly on the base to reveal the pinkish-buff body, the interior applied with a transparent yellow-tinged glaze with three spur marks to the rim
Height 8 1/8  in., 20.8 cm 
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Provenance

Hirano Koto-ken, Tokyo, 1976. 

Exhibited

Chūgoku bijutsu ten: Zui Tō no bijutsu [Chinese Art exhibition series: The Art of the Sui and Tang dynasties], Osaka Art Museum, Osaka, 1976, cat. no. 1.45.

Catalogue Note

Vessels covered entirely in cobalt blue were an innovation of the Tang dynasty that can be traced back to at least the 7th century. These wares were highly valued, as the cobalt used for making them is believed to have been imported.  

A jar and cover of similar proportions, in the Meiyintang Collection, is illustrated in Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics from the Meiyintang Collection, vol. 3 (I), London, 2006, pl. 1294; one in the Gemeentemuseum, The Hague, is illustrated in Nigel Wood, Chinese Glazes, London, 1999, p. 204; another was sold in our London rooms, 23rd May 1972, lot 73; and a slightly smaller example from the Ataka Collection, in the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, is published in Masterpieces of Chinese and Korean Ceramics in the Ataka Collection. China, Tokyo, 1980, pl. 52. See also a much larger blue-glazed jar and cover, from the collection of the National Trust at Ascott House, published in Margaret Medley, T’ang Pottery and Porcelain, London, 1981, p. 16.

A Noble Pursuit: Important Chinese and Korean Art from a Japanese Private Collection

|
New York