Lot 502
  • 502

A RARE BLUE AND WHITE SQUARE-FORM 'FLORAL' JAR JIAJING MARK AND PERIOD |

Estimate
60,000 - 80,000 USD
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Description

  • Height 8 in., 20.2 cm
the squat baluster form surmounted by a straight neck and lipped rim, the exterior painted on each of the four sides with chrysanthemum, rose and peony blossoms potted alongside ornamental rocks in jardinières supported on rectangular stands within a garden, with butterflies in flight on either side, all above a lappet band at the foot and below a border of ruyi at the shoulder, the neck collared by a keyfret band, the base with a six-character reign mark within a double-square in underglaze blue, two Japanese wood boxes (5)

Provenance

Hirano Koto-ken, Tokyo, June 1982.

Exhibited

Chūgoku bijutsu ten series: Min Shin no bijutsu [Chinese Art exhibition series. The Art of the Ming and Qing dynasties], Osaka Art Museum, Osaka, 1980, cat. no. 1-60.

Literature

Sekai tōji zenshū/Catalogue of World's Ceramics, vol. 11, Tokyo, 1955, pl. 119.
Sekai tōji zenshū [Ceramic Art of the World], vol. 14, Tokyo, 1976, pl. 189.

Condition

The jar is in good condition.
In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Catalogue Note

Jars of this square form were popular in the Jiajing reign and display the creative freedom enjoyed by craftsmen active at Jingdezhen in this period. Porcelain production experienced a renewed flowering under Jiajing, as the court’s increased demand for luxurious items resulted in the engagement of private kilns that worked alongside the imperial kilns, and introduced an increased number of unconventional forms and designs, including square jars. While jars of this form are known painted with numerous designs, those with this auspicious motif of flowers in vases are unusual. A round jar painted with this motif from the H. Lauritzen Collection, in the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, Stockholm, is illustrated in L. Reidemeister, Ming-Porzellane in Schwedischen Sammlungen, Berlin, 1935, pl. 19c.

Compare also a smaller square jar painted with floral sprays and insects, sold in our London rooms, 7th December 1993, lot 227; and one with flowers issuing from rockwork painted in wucai enamels, illustrated in Sekai tōij zenshū/Catalogue of World’s Ceramics, vol. 11, Tokyo, 1955, fig. 123.