45
45

PROPERTY FROM A PALM BEACH COLLECTION

T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings
CONSOLE TABLE AND PIER MIRROR FROM THE CASA ENCANTADA, BEL AIR, CALIFORNIA
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
45

PROPERTY FROM A PALM BEACH COLLECTION

T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings
CONSOLE TABLE AND PIER MIRROR FROM THE CASA ENCANTADA, BEL AIR, CALIFORNIA
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

|
New York

T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings
CONSOLE TABLE AND PIER MIRROR FROM THE CASA ENCANTADA, BEL AIR, CALIFORNIA
polychromed, gilt and carved limewood, mirrored glass, clear glass
console:  36 x 60 x 19 in. (91.4 x 152.4 x 48.2 cm)
mirror:  64 x 53 in. (162.5 x 134.6 cm)
when assembled: 100 3/4  x 60 1/4  x 19 1/8  in. (255.9 x 153 x 48.5 cm)
1937
executed by Peterson Studios, Santa Barbara
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Mrs. J. O. Weber, Casa Encantada, Bel Air, California
Conrad Hilton, Casa Encantada, Bel Air, California
Sotheby's Parke Bernet Inc., New York, Neo-Classical Art Moderne Furniture, February 5, 1981, lot 57
Collection of John Delorean, New York
Sotheby's New York, November 7, 1992, lot 384
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature

Sam Watters, Houses of Los Angeles: 1920-1935, Vol. II, New York, 2007, p. 342 (for the present lot illustrated)
Daniella Ohad Smith, “T. H. Robsjohn-Gibbings: Crafting a Modern Home for Postwar America,” Journal of Interior Design, no. 34, 2008, p. 43 (for the present lot illustrated)
Jennifer A. Watts, ed., Maynard L. Parker: Modern Photography and the American Dream, New Haven, 2012, p. 33 (for the present lot illustrated)

Catalogue Note


This console and its accompanying pier mirror, with columns terminating in exotic birds and resting upon a lotus leaf base, encapsulate the sense of neoclassical fantasy created by T. H. Robsjohn-Gibbings at Casa Encantada. The Bel Air home was created for Mrs. J. O. Weber between 1934 and 1938, and purchased intact by Conrad Hilton in 1952. Described as an eclectic combination of Georgian Revival style and Greco-Roman architecture, the manor’s interior was as carefully planned as its exterior. Robsjohn-Gibbings oversaw the décor and furnishings, successfully creating pieces that simultaneously evoked the art of ancient Greece, colonial American furniture, and aspects of Art Deco design. The work that he produced there epitomizes the style so often associated to his oeuvre, one that is dependent on no single historical moment or artistic movement. He rejected the aesthetic of the Machine Age and instead embraced an overall classicizing style. Earth tones and shades of cream were his palette of predilection, one he applied to the high-quality decorative designs that once furnished Casa Encantada. Robsjohn-Gibbings considered the two-hundred piece commission one his most important achievements, and the furniture he created for it has remained unique and timeless in the eyes of art and design collectors.

Important Design

|
New York