246
246
Prejevalsky, Nikolai
TRET’E PUTESHESTVIYE V’ TSENTRAL’NOI AZII IZ’ ZAYSANA CHEREZ’ KHAMI V’ TIBET’ I NA VERKHOV’YA ZHELTOI REKI [THE THIRD JOURNEY IN CENTRAL ASIA FROM ZAYSAN THROUGH KHAMA TO TIBET AND ON THE UPPER REACHES OF THE YELLOW RIVER]. ST PETERSBURG: IMPERIAL RUSSIAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, 1883
Estimate
1,0001,500
LOT SOLD. 1,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
246
Prejevalsky, Nikolai
TRET’E PUTESHESTVIYE V’ TSENTRAL’NOI AZII IZ’ ZAYSANA CHEREZ’ KHAMI V’ TIBET’ I NA VERKHOV’YA ZHELTOI REKI [THE THIRD JOURNEY IN CENTRAL ASIA FROM ZAYSAN THROUGH KHAMA TO TIBET AND ON THE UPPER REACHES OF THE YELLOW RIVER]. ST PETERSBURG: IMPERIAL RUSSIAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, 1883
Estimate
1,0001,500
LOT SOLD. 1,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Travel, Atlases, Maps & Natural History

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Prejevalsky, Nikolai
TRET’E PUTESHESTVIYE V’ TSENTRAL’NOI AZII IZ’ ZAYSANA CHEREZ’ KHAMI V’ TIBET’ I NA VERKHOV’YA ZHELTOI REKI [THE THIRD JOURNEY IN CENTRAL ASIA FROM ZAYSAN THROUGH KHAMA TO TIBET AND ON THE UPPER REACHES OF THE YELLOW RIVER]. ST PETERSBURG: IMPERIAL RUSSIAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, 1883
FIRST EDITION, 4to (246 x 194mm.), Russian text, half-title, 107 (of 108) plates (106 lithographed and one woodcut), 3 folding, 2 large folding lithographed maps at end, other illustrations in text, errata leaf, modern brown half morocco gilt, gilt patterned boards, some strengthening to pages, a little light scattered spotting, lacking one plate (to face p. 344), slight wear to maps
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Literature

Yakushi (1994) P296 (note); not in Czech (Asia)

Catalogue Note

In 1879 Prejevalsky launched his third and most successful attempt to reach Lhasa. In November 1879 having reached Nagchu, some 270km from Lhasa he was forbidden to travel further by Tibetan officials who had been informed by Chinese ambassadors that his intent was to kidnap the Dalai Lama.

'Przhevalskii's expeditions, which preceded those of Sven Hedin and the host of later Europeans, had for the first time since Marco Polo and his successors defined the basic geography of Central Asia. It had visited places known only by rumour or report and had returned with a mass of meteorological, scientific and biological data. [He] was honoured by Tsar Aleksandr III with promotion to major-general. He had discovered the wild population of  Bactrian camels as well as what became known as Prezewalski's horse and Prezewalski's gazelle' (Howgego).

Travel, Atlases, Maps & Natural History

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London