937
937
Von Neumann, John (1903-1957), Burks, Arthur W. (1915-2008) and Goldstine, Herman H. (1913-2004)
PRELIMINARY DISCUSSION OF THE LOGICAL DESIGN OF AN ELECTRONIC COMPUTING INSTRUMENT. PART I, VOLUME I. PRINCETON: INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY, 1947.
Estimate
1,5002,000
LOT SOLD. 2,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
937
Von Neumann, John (1903-1957), Burks, Arthur W. (1915-2008) and Goldstine, Herman H. (1913-2004)
PRELIMINARY DISCUSSION OF THE LOGICAL DESIGN OF AN ELECTRONIC COMPUTING INSTRUMENT. PART I, VOLUME I. PRINCETON: INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY, 1947.
Estimate
1,5002,000
LOT SOLD. 2,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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London

Von Neumann, John (1903-1957), Burks, Arthur W. (1915-2008) and Goldstine, Herman H. (1913-2004)
PRELIMINARY DISCUSSION OF THE LOGICAL DESIGN OF AN ELECTRONIC COMPUTING INSTRUMENT. PART I, VOLUME I. PRINCETON: INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY, 1947.
Second edition, 4to (277 x 210mm.), original paper wrappers, stapled, [T&W B292], wrappers with tears to spine and lower cover, staples rusting
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

bought from Scientia, Arlington, MA, 1990

Literature

Tomash & Williams B292; Origins of Cyberspace 959; Randell 1979 p.115

Catalogue Note

The first published formal conceptual paper on the stored-program computer.

This report, to the Army Ordnance Department, outlined the design of what came to be known as the "von Neumann"-style machine. It was one of the most detailed available on the construction and design for a stored computer. The "stored program concept" is the theory that instructions, like data, can be stored in numerical format in the internal memory of the machine. It is regarded as the one of greatest innovations in the history of the computer.

The authors, three chief members of the IAS Electronic Computer Project, explain: "If, however, the orders to the machine are reduced to a numerical code and if the machine can in some fashion distinguish a number from an order, the memory organ can be used to store both numbers and orders"

The paper was first published in July, 1946, although the present copy is the first regularly and formally distributed edition. It includes considerable expansion on the "arithmetic organ" and sections were updated to reflect the engineering advances made by the team the previous nine months.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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London