931
931
Turing, Alan Mathison (1912-1954)
"COMPUTING MACHINERY AND INTELLIGENCE" [IN:] MIND, VOL. 59, NO. 236, PP.433-460. EDINBURGH: THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, OCTOBER 1950 
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 4,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
931
Turing, Alan Mathison (1912-1954)
"COMPUTING MACHINERY AND INTELLIGENCE" [IN:] MIND, VOL. 59, NO. 236, PP.433-460. EDINBURGH: THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, OCTOBER 1950 
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 4,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

Turing, Alan Mathison (1912-1954)
"COMPUTING MACHINERY AND INTELLIGENCE" [IN:] MIND, VOL. 59, NO. 236, PP.433-460. EDINBURGH: THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, OCTOBER 1950 
8vo (214 x 140mm.), original grey wrappers, a few minor tears to edges of wrappers and at head and base of spine, minor browning [together with:]
Pinsky, Leonard. "Do machines think about machines thinking?" [in:] Mind, vol. 60, no. 239, July 1951, pp.397-398. Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson & Sons, 1951, original wrappers, wrappers worn, lower wrapper nearly detached
8vo (2)
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

bought from Interlibrum, Vaduz, 1987

Literature

Turing: Tomash & Williams T60; Origins of Cyberspace 936; Pinsky: Tomash & Williams P85

Catalogue Note

THE FIRST APPEARANCE OF THE TURING TEST: "THE IMITATION GAME".

In Turing's paper, which remains the benchmark in all subsequent questions of Artificial Intelligence as to whether a machine or computer can think, the computer scientist proposes the "Imitation Game", in which a human judge engaged in conversation must assess whether he is speaking with a human or instead only a machine designed to imitate a human. It is the most lucid and far-reaching expression of Turing's philosophy, summarising his view that the operation of the brain could (and indeed would) be captured by a machine and hence by a computer.

Pinsky's paper is a commentary on Turing's. Pinsky, noting that some problems involve the use of “metaphysical” sentences, could not resist humorously suggesting that if a computer were given a copy of Turing’s paper, it might be forced to use “metamechanical” statements to avoid its own mental breakdown.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London