912
912
Slonimski, Hayyim Selig (1810-1904)
SEFER YESODEI HOKHMAT HA-SHIUR. ANFANGSGRÜNDE DER GESAMMTEN MATHEMATIK ZUM SELBSTUNTERRICHT. ZHITOMIR: A. S. SZADOW, 1865
LOT SOLD. 250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
912
Slonimski, Hayyim Selig (1810-1904)
SEFER YESODEI HOKHMAT HA-SHIUR. ANFANGSGRÜNDE DER GESAMMTEN MATHEMATIK ZUM SELBSTUNTERRICHT. ZHITOMIR: A. S. SZADOW, 1865
LOT SOLD. 250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

Slonimski, Hayyim Selig (1810-1904)
SEFER YESODEI HOKHMAT HA-SHIUR. ANFANGSGRÜNDE DER GESAMMTEN MATHEMATIK ZUM SELBSTUNTERRICHT. ZHITOMIR: A. S. SZADOW, 1865
8vo (223 x 145mm.), text in Hebrew, 3 folding plates, quarter morocco over marbled boards, original printed yellow wrappers bound in, parallel title-page in Hebrew and German, upper wrapper in Hebrew, lower wrapper in German, edges yellow, previous ownership inscription in ink, browning and spotting throughout, a few leaves chipping at edges, bumped and rubbed
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Tomash & Williams S126

Catalogue Note

Slonimski was an author, inventor and rabbi involved in the Eastern European Haskalah movement in the early nineteenth century. Slonimski published his first book at the age of 24. He was concerned that the Sciences were being ignored by the Jewish community and so he wrote his works in Hebrew while maintaining his position as an Orthodox rabbi.

Beyond his publications, Slonimski established himself as an inventor. He invented a calculations machine in 1844, as well as a device that allowed four telegrams to be sent at once. His telegraph invention gained particular notoriety when Stalin in a 1952 speech noted that the Russians anticipated the Americans with certain elements in the technical development of the telegraph. Stalin’s speech was immediately ridiculed with the New York Times going so far as to claim that Stalin had invented Slonimski.

The present volume is a technical mathematical text on arithmetic, geometry and algebra.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London