838
838
Horsburgh, Ellice Martin (1870-1935), editor
TWO EDITIONS OF THE HANDBOOK RELATING TO THE NAPIER TERCENTENARY EXHIBITION:
Estimate
7001,000
LOT SOLD. 875 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
838
Horsburgh, Ellice Martin (1870-1935), editor
TWO EDITIONS OF THE HANDBOOK RELATING TO THE NAPIER TERCENTENARY EXHIBITION:
Estimate
7001,000
LOT SOLD. 875 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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London

Horsburgh, Ellice Martin (1870-1935), editor
TWO EDITIONS OF THE HANDBOOK RELATING TO THE NAPIER TERCENTENARY EXHIBITION:
i. Napier tercentenary celebration. Handbook of the exhibition of Napier's relics and of books, instruments, & devices for facilitating calculation. Edinburgh: Royal Society of Edinburgh, 1914, first edition, plates, modern black cloth with original pale blue wrappers affixed to covers, (bought from Graham Weiner), [T&W H165; Origins of Cyberspace 322; Randell 1979 p.138], minor foxing to wrappers and preliminaries
ii. Modern Instruments and Methods of Calculation. A Handbook of the Napier Tercentenary Exhibition. London: G. Bell & Sons and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, [1915], manuscript notes dated 29 July 1933 on front endpaper and incorporating corrections by Comrie on p.48, original green cloth, preserved in folding cloth box, ownership signatures of J.P. Johnston and (?) Chas. D. Humberd, (bought from Jonathan Hill, 1979), [T&W H166; Origins of Cyberspace 323], cloth slightly nicked and worn at extremities, hinges starting, minor spotting
large 8vo (2)
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Catalogue Note

FIRST EDITION of the rare catalogue presented to those who attended the Napier exhibition, together with the later hard-cover edition with a slightly altered title-page. The exhibition marked the three-hundredth anniversary of the publication of Mirifici Logarithmorum Canonis Descriptio, in which Napier described his invention of logarithms. The celebration was held between 24 and 27 July 1914, but the conference on mathematical computation planned for shortly afterwards was cancelled owing to the rising political tensions in Europe, with most delegates (who had attended from the UK, France, Germany and elsewhere) leaving Edinburgh five days before the outbreak of World War I. The volume contains the best description of the machines, instruments and calculation techniques used prior to 1914.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London