797
797
Differential analysers
A COLLECTION OF 12 ITEMS, COMPRISING:
LOT SOLD. 375 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
797
Differential analysers
A COLLECTION OF 12 ITEMS, COMPRISING:
LOT SOLD. 375 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

Differential analysers
A COLLECTION OF 12 ITEMS, COMPRISING:
i. Crank, John (1916-2006). The differential analyser. London: Longmans, Green & Co. 1947, original cloth, dust-jacket [T&W C200; Origins of Cyberspace 555 (with dust wrapper)]
ii. Hazen, Harold Locke (1901-1980), Jaeger, J.J., and Brown, Gordon Stanley (1907-1996). "An automatic curve follower" [in:] The Review of Scientific instruments, vol. 7, no. 9, new series, September 1936, pp.353-357. New York: American Institute of Physics, 1936, original wrappers, (bought from Yelm Books, Whitestone, NY, 2002), [T&W H87]
iii. Macmillan, Robert Hugh (1921-2015). An introduction to the theory of control in mechanical engineering. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1951, original black cloth boards, (Franklin Institute Library, book label; bought from Elgen, Rockville Centre, NY, 1990), [T&W M15], slightly browned
iv. Bush, Vannevar (1890-1974). "The differential analyzer" [in:] Journal of the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA, vol. 212, no. 4, October 1931, pp.447-488. Philadelphia: Franklin Institute, 1931, black cloth, (Philadelphia Electric Library, book label; bought from Bernard Quaritch, London, 1996), [T&W B297; Origins of Cyberspace 244])
v. Crank, John. The differential analyser. London: Longmans, Green & Co. 1947, original cloth, covers slightly stained, (Franklin Institute Library, book label), [T&W C200; Origins of Cyberspace 555 (has dust wrapper)]
vi. Elliot Brothers (London) Limited. Elliot Journal, vol. 1, number 2, September 1951, pp.37-68. London: Elliott Brothers, 1951, original wrappers, [T&W E5]
vii. Hartree, Douglas Raynor (1897-1958) and Alexander K. Nuttall. "The differential analyser and its applications in electrical engineering" [from:] Journal of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, vol. 83, July-December 1938, pp.643-647, London: E and F.N. Spon, 1938, disbound, (bought from Jeff Weber, Glendale, CA, 2002), [T&W H32]; [also including:] Hartree, Douglas Raynor and Arthur Porter (1910-2010). "The application of the differential analyzer to transients on a distortionless transmission line", pp.648-656, [T&W H33]
viii. Hartree, Douglas Raynor (1897-1958) "A great calculating machine: The Bush differential analyser and its application in science and industry" [in:] Royal Institution of Great Britain, Weekly Evening Meeting, Friday, May 17, 1940. London: Royal Institution of Great Britain, 1940, stapled pamphlet, [T&W H36]
ix. Kusters, N.L. The Ott differential analyser. London: HMSO [British Intelligence Objectives Sub-Committee], 1947, mimeograph, original green wrappers, [T&W K71; Origins of Cyberspace 823]
x. Rose, H.E. "The mechanical differential analyser. Its principles, development and applications" [in:] Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, vol. 159 (War Emergency Issue, no. 38, pp.16-54). London: Institution of Mechanical Engineers, 1948, original wrappers, [T&W R113], wrappers slightly creased and torn; [also including:] Porter, Arthur. "Basic principles of automatic control systems", pp.25-45, [T&W P102]; Redshaw, S. C. "An electrical potential analyser", pp.55-80 [T&W R46]
xi. University of California. The Differential analyzer of the University of California. Los Angeles: University of California, 1947, original blue wrappers, [T&W U4]
xii. Hartree, Douglas Raynor (1897-1958). "The application of the differential analyzer to the evaluation of solutions of partial differential equations" [in:] Proceedings of the First Canadian Mathematical Congress, Montreal, 1945. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1946, original red cloth, [not in T&W]
8vo
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

EARLY ACCOUNTS OF THE FIRST MODERN ANALOG COMPUTER.

The differential analyser, a mechanical analog computer designed to solve differential equations by integration, was one of the first advanced computing devices to be used operationally. Vannevar Bush and Harold Locke Hazen constructed the first practical differential analyser at MIT between 1928 and 1931, and the fourth item here is Bush's account of the construction and demonstration of how it might solve differential equations. British versions were then built at Manchester and Cambridge Universities. The first experimental differential analyser model was assembled at Manchester by Douglas Hartree and Arthur Porter, using a Meccano (United States: Erecter) construction set.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London