68
68
Bird, John (1709-1776)
TWO WORKS BY BIRD, COMPRISING:
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 1,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
68
Bird, John (1709-1776)
TWO WORKS BY BIRD, COMPRISING:
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 1,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

Bird, John (1709-1776)
TWO WORKS BY BIRD, COMPRISING:
The method of dividing astronomical instruments... published by order of the Commissioners of Longitude. London: John Nourse and Mount and Page, 1767, 4to (258 x 205mm.), engraved folding plate (numbered IV, see footnote), title of first somewhat soiled

The method of constructing mural quadrants... published by order of the Commissioners of Longitude. London: printed by W. Richardson and S. Clark, sold by John Nourse, 1768, 4to (260 x 201mm.), half-title, 3 engraved folding plates (numbered I-III, see footnote), plates loose in a modern cloth folder

FIRST EDITIONS, both in modern wrappers (not uniform), housed in a modern cloth folding box


Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

bought from Jonathan Hill, New York, 1988

Literature

Tomash & Williams B167 & B168; ESTC T132422 (large paper copy recording plate no.IV) and T132423, T132367; [first title] Adams & Waters 171; Taylor, Hanoverian 232

Catalogue Note

John Bird was an eminent maker of mathematical instruments. "Not only were Bird's instruments the most accurately graduated prior to the invention of the dividing engine, but by his example and his publications [of these two works] others were enabled to achieve greater precision in scientific instrumentation" (DSB, II, p.141).

The first work is sometimes found bound with The principle of Mr Harrison's time-keeper, which was also published in 1767 and sold by Nourse, Mount and Page, and described Harrison's chronometer, which revolutionised the science of navigation. Indeed Bird was on the committee appointed by the Board of Longitude to assess Harrison's time-piece.

It seems likely that the first title is a large paper copy, slightly cut down (large paper are described as 270mm. in height, ordinary copies 236mm.). Plate IV only is noted in ESTC and in the copy sold (bound with Harrison) in these rooms 28 November 2012, lot 153. The second work was also sold in this Sammelband containing plates I-III. (For an explanation see Tomash & Williams B168, footnote).

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London