650
650
Tables, metric conversions
A COLLECTION OF 4 VOLUMES, COMPRISING:
Estimate
1,5002,500
JUMP TO LOT
650
Tables, metric conversions
A COLLECTION OF 4 VOLUMES, COMPRISING:
Estimate
1,5002,500
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

Tables, metric conversions
A COLLECTION OF 4 VOLUMES, COMPRISING:
i. Martin, C. François. Poids et mesures de la ville de Marseille. Marseilles: Requier, 1807, 8vo, 2 folding tables, 2 regulateurs printed on yellow card in pocket at rear, one large, one small and signed, contemporary boards, [T&W M46]
ii. Martin, C. François. Le régulateur universel des poids et mesures… seconde édition. Bordeaux, Avignon & Paris: J. Foulquier, M. Ray, M. Courcier, 1809, 8vo, 3 folding tables, overslip on title, 2 “regulateurs” printed on yellow card in pocket at front, authentication signature, contemporary calf, (bought from Roger Gaskell, Warboys, 1990), [T&W M47], one table torn, binding slightly worn
iii. Martin, C. François. Another copy. One smaller regulateur in pocket at front, signed (the title page calls for two regulateurs), contemporary calf, (bought from Cedric & Ithier de Fougerolle, Issy-les-Moulineaux, 1994), [T&W M47]
iv. Martin, C. François. Another issue. Avignon and Paris: Berenguier and Courcier, 1809, 8vo, 2 folding tables, regulateur in pocket at front (title-page calls for one regulateur), later boards, (bought from Rogers Turner, London, 1990), [T&W M47]
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

Le régulateur universel is a set of tables for calculating the metric equivalents of old units of length, weight, area, capacity and currency, and for calculating interest, accompanied by small rectangles of card. When a card is laid over the table, the conversion is read through the aperture. The first edition appears to be the one printed in 1807 as Le parfait régulateur of which a copy was sold in these rooms on 13 May 1980 (Honeyman Collection, lot 2163, with a regulator made of brass; see lot 549/iv).

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London