566
566
Rheticus, Georg Joachim (1514-1574)
OPUS PALATINUM DE TRIANGULIS... L. VALENTINUS OTHO PRINCIPIS PALATINI FRIDERICI IV ELECTORIS MATHEMATICUS CONSUMMAVIT. NEUSTADT: MATTHAEUS HARNISCH, 1596
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
566
Rheticus, Georg Joachim (1514-1574)
OPUS PALATINUM DE TRIANGULIS... L. VALENTINUS OTHO PRINCIPIS PALATINI FRIDERICI IV ELECTORIS MATHEMATICUS CONSUMMAVIT. NEUSTADT: MATTHAEUS HARNISCH, 1596
Estimate
20,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

Rheticus, Georg Joachim (1514-1574)
OPUS PALATINUM DE TRIANGULIS... L. VALENTINUS OTHO PRINCIPIS PALATINI FRIDERICI IV ELECTORIS MATHEMATICUS CONSUMMAVIT. NEUSTADT: MATTHAEUS HARNISCH, 1596
FIRST EDITION, folio (377 x 225mm), 6 parts in one volume, final blank, title within an architectural engraved border, numerical tables, some printed in red and black, woodcut diagrams, device at the end of the 3rd part ("Neostadii in Palatinu. Excudebat Matthaeus Harnisus"), contemporary blind-stamped pigskin over wooden boards, title stained and trimmed at foredge, stamp erased, a few wormholes including to title and final four leaves, first 20 leaves of the first part affected by damp (with staining and a few holes), without 3 blank leaves, binding slightly worn, lacking clasps
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Provenance

bought from Jonathan Hill, New York, 1995

Literature

Tomash & Williams R81; VD16 J 278, VD16 ZV 18220; USTC 679854

Catalogue Note

The mathematician and astronomer Georg Rheticus was the only pupil of Nicolaus Copernicus, whose De revolutionibus he helped publish. His major work was on the study of triangles, culminating in this comprehensive set of tables to be used in angular astronomical measurements; it also includes the first use of the word "cosecant". It was completed and published after his death by Valentin Otho (c.1545-1603). The tables were accurate enough to be used in astronomical computation into the early twentieth century.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London