552
552
Recorde, Robert (1510?-1558)
THE GROUNDE OF ARTES: TEACHING THE WORK AND PRACTICE OF ARITHMETIKE, BOTHE IN WHOLE NUMBERS AND FRACTIONS... AUGMENTED WITH NEWE AND NECESSARIE ADDITIONS. LONDON: (HENRY BINNEMAN AND JOHN HARISON), 1575
Estimate
3,0004,000
LOT SOLD. 10,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
552
Recorde, Robert (1510?-1558)
THE GROUNDE OF ARTES: TEACHING THE WORK AND PRACTICE OF ARITHMETIKE, BOTHE IN WHOLE NUMBERS AND FRACTIONS... AUGMENTED WITH NEWE AND NECESSARIE ADDITIONS. LONDON: (HENRY BINNEMAN AND JOHN HARISON), 1575
Estimate
3,0004,000
LOT SOLD. 10,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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London

Recorde, Robert (1510?-1558)
THE GROUNDE OF ARTES: TEACHING THE WORK AND PRACTICE OF ARITHMETIKE, BOTHE IN WHOLE NUMBERS AND FRACTIONS... AUGMENTED WITH NEWE AND NECESSARIE ADDITIONS. LONDON: (HENRY BINNEMAN AND JOHN HARISON), 1575
8vo (145 x 93mm.), woodcut illustration and diagrams, woodcut printer's device on last leaf with imprint, nineteenth-century calf, spine gilt, title and last leaf soiled, rebacked retaining original spine
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Provenance

John Heales ("I am John Heales Arithmetike 1664"), inscription on title; W. Milton, inscription on title; Christie's, 16 December 1991, lot 266, Erwin Tomash

Literature

Tomash & Williams R43; ESTC S106509; STC 20801

Catalogue Note

Recorde’s The Grounde of Artes (1543), edited and augmented after the author’s death by John Dee, was the standard arithmetic textbook of the period, passing through numerous editions until 1673, long after the work should have been obsolete. Dee’s contributions were of a practical matter, being sections on foreign exchange and on foreign weights and measures. Dee also added a long poem “I.D. to the earnest Arithmetician” in which he promoted his "Mathematical Praeface" to Billingsley's English translation of Euclid (1570). 

This copy contains a short manuscript biography of the author on B8v in an early hand.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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London