479
479
[Oughtred, William (1575-1660)]
THE CIRCLES OF PROPORTION. LONDON, 1632 [I.E. 1634]
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 2,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
479
[Oughtred, William (1575-1660)]
THE CIRCLES OF PROPORTION. LONDON, 1632 [I.E. 1634]
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 2,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

[Oughtred, William (1575-1660)]
THE CIRCLES OF PROPORTION. LONDON, 1632 [I.E. 1634]
FIRST EDITION (later issue), 3 parts in one (includes: "An addition unto the use of the instrument called the circles of proportion", and "To the English gentrie"), small 4to (176 x 128mm.), engraved additional title dated 1632 and 3 plates, woodcut diagrams and illustrations, errata leaf at end of first 2 parts, modern morocco-backed cloth, lacking printed title page and blank A1 to first part and final ?blank at end of second part, engraved title cut down and mounted, first plate worn and restored at edge, somewhat browned and soiled
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Harrison D. Horblit (1912-1988), book label; bought from H.P. Kraus, New York, 1995, Catalogue 178, item 120, $9,800

Literature

Tomash & Williams O37, O35, O44; STC 18899 (a or b), [part 2] 18899c, [part 3] 18901a; ESTC S113634 or S120820 or S126261, [part 2] S105819, [part 3] S119424

Catalogue Note

The third part in this copy of Oughtred's Circles of proportion is "To the English gentrie, and all others studious of the mathematicks, which shall bee readers hereof. The just apologie of Wil: Oughtred, against the slaunderous insimulations of Richard Delamain, in a pamphlet called Grammelogia". [London: A. Mathewes, 1634?], 32pp. (A-D4).

As this copy is lacking a letterpress title-page, it is difficult to be certain of the exact issue, but as it contains all three parts it is probably the third issue. This copy contains the original errata leaf at the end of the first part and the cancel B4 in the second part, but does not have the printed errata slip pasted at the end of the third part.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London