477
477
[Oughtred, William (1575-1660)]
ARITHMETICAE IN NUMERIS ET SPECIEBUS INSTITUTIO: QUAE TUM LOGISTICAE, TUM ANALYTICAE, ATQUE ADEO TOTIUS MATHEMATICAE, QUASI CLAVIS EST. LONDON: THOMAS HARPER, 1631
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 10,625 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
477
[Oughtred, William (1575-1660)]
ARITHMETICAE IN NUMERIS ET SPECIEBUS INSTITUTIO: QUAE TUM LOGISTICAE, TUM ANALYTICAE, ATQUE ADEO TOTIUS MATHEMATICAE, QUASI CLAVIS EST. LONDON: THOMAS HARPER, 1631
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 10,625 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London

[Oughtred, William (1575-1660)]
ARITHMETICAE IN NUMERIS ET SPECIEBUS INSTITUTIO: QUAE TUM LOGISTICAE, TUM ANALYTICAE, ATQUE ADEO TOTIUS MATHEMATICAE, QUASI CLAVIS EST. LONDON: THOMAS HARPER, 1631
FIRST EDITION, 8vo (168 x 102mm.), woodcut diagrams, old vellum, modern red morocco label
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Thomas Miller Rickman (1827-1912), quantity surveyor and architect, past president of the Surveyor's Institution, signature; The Surveyor's Institution (London), presentation bookplate from Rickman, 1908; Harrison D. Horblit (1912-1988), book label; H.P. Kraus, New York, Catalogue 168, item 118, $4000; bought from Pickering & Chatto, London, 1993

Literature

Tomash & Williams O34; ESTC S110220; STC 18898; Norman 1621

Catalogue Note

"This work, [Oughtred's first and] perhaps his most important, is better known as Clavis mathematicae, the title adopted for later editions (and used as a running head on each page of this one). Oughtred began to write it around 1628 when he was employed by the Earl of Arundel to instruct his son (Lord William Howard, afterward Viscount Stafford) in mathematics. He wrote this treatise as a text for the young man to use and a few years later was asked to publish it by one of his pupil's relatives (Charles Cavendish). Despite its small size, it contained all the elements of arithmetic and algebra then known. It was in this work that Oughtred introduced several mathematical symbols (the "x" for multiplication and "::" for proportion) still in use today. He also gave many examples of the use of decimal fractions" (Tomash & Williams).

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London