379
379
Longomontanus, Christian Sørensen (1562?-1647)
ASTRONOMIA DANICA... CUM APPENDICE DE ASSCITITIIS COELI PHAENOMENIS, NEMPE STELLIS NOVIS ET COMETIS. AMSTERDAM: WILLEM JANSZ BLAEU, 1622
Estimate
3,0004,000
JUMP TO LOT
379
Longomontanus, Christian Sørensen (1562?-1647)
ASTRONOMIA DANICA... CUM APPENDICE DE ASSCITITIIS COELI PHAENOMENIS, NEMPE STELLIS NOVIS ET COMETIS. AMSTERDAM: WILLEM JANSZ BLAEU, 1622
Estimate
3,0004,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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London

Longomontanus, Christian Sørensen (1562?-1647)
ASTRONOMIA DANICA... CUM APPENDICE DE ASSCITITIIS COELI PHAENOMENIS, NEMPE STELLIS NOVIS ET COMETIS. AMSTERDAM: WILLEM JANSZ BLAEU, 1622
FIRST EDITION, 2 parts in one volume, 4to (241 x 189mm.), woodcut device on titles, woodcut initials, numerous diagrams, old vellum, green edges, slight spotting or staining, some worming mostly to vellum
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Provenance

'P.H.', initials on bookplate; bought from Martayan Lan, New York, 1995, Catalogue 8, item 85, $3,850

Literature

Tomash & Williams L129; Houzeau & Lancaster 2926; STCN 081634811, 081635001; USTC
1012851

Catalogue Note

Longomontanus was Tycho's disciple and this work is a great summary of Tycho's astronomical researches, based on his data, and denying Copernicus's heliocentrism and Kepler's elliptical orbits.

"Longomontanus proved to be the ideal assistant to Brahe and took over much of his work after he died. Although Brahe had made careful and complete observations, it remained for Longomontanus to present them in this treatise as an integrated system. This work, although based on the erroneous Tychonic theory, was very well accepted and was reprinted in 1640 and 1663.

"It is of particular significance that the work contains numerous tables calculated by the method of prosthaphaeresis (here called prosthaphaereseon). Prosthaphaeresis, (from the Greek words for addition and subtraction) is one of the standard computational shortcuts in use before the invention of logarithms" (Tomash & Williams).

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London