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Apianus, Petrus (1495-1551)
EYN NEWE UNND WOLGEGRÜNDTE UNDERWEYSUNG ALLER KAUFFMANSS RECHNUNG. (INGOLSTADT: GEORG APIANUS, 9 AUGUST 1527)
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
13
Apianus, Petrus (1495-1551)
EYN NEWE UNND WOLGEGRÜNDTE UNDERWEYSUNG ALLER KAUFFMANSS RECHNUNG. (INGOLSTADT: GEORG APIANUS, 9 AUGUST 1527)
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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London

Apianus, Petrus (1495-1551)
EYN NEWE UNND WOLGEGRÜNDTE UNDERWEYSUNG ALLER KAUFFMANSS RECHNUNG. (INGOLSTADT: GEORG APIANUS, 9 AUGUST 1527)
FIRST EDITION, 8vo (147 x 95mm.), title within a woodcut border and with woodcut illustrations, full-page woodcut armorial on verso of title-page, woodcut illustrations, numerous early annotations, contemporary blind-stamped pigskin over wooden boards, 2 clasps, new endpapers, binding rubbed, spine chipped at head
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Provenance

Robert B. Honeyman (1897-1987), sale in these rooms, 30 October 1978, lot 110, £4,200; Reiss & Auvermann, 15-18 October 1991, lot 4, DM 28,000, Erwin Tomash

Literature

Tomash & Williams A82; Hoock & Jeannin I, A7.1; USTC 654687; VD16 A 3094

Catalogue Note

RARE. This appears to be the only copy recorded at auction in recent decades. The book states at the end that it was finished on 7 August by Petrus Apianus, and printed by his brother Georg on 9 August. Apianus's Rechenbuch encompasses the work of earlier published arithmetics (including those of Rudolff and Schreiber), and proved to be a successful work of commercial arithmetic, being reprinted many times throughout the sixteenth century.

One of the diagrams on the title-page shows the Pascal triangle, a century before Pascal, although it was known to earlier Chinese and Arabian mathematicians; it contains the binomial coefficients as far as the number 8. Apianus also introduced in this work the first notation for multiplying and dividing fractions. There are other interesting woodcuts including a depiction of a man minting coins, finger reckoning and a group of students doing mathematical sums.

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
London