92
92
A George II mahogany Bureau Cabinet, circa 1745
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 23,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
92
A George II mahogany Bureau Cabinet, circa 1745
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 23,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York

A George II mahogany Bureau Cabinet, circa 1745
height 99 1/2 in.; width 41 1/2 in.; depth 25 in.
253 cm; 105.5 cm; 63.5 cm
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Provenance

Jean Flagler Matthews, Brookside, Rye, New York, thence by descent
Christie's New York, October 12, 1996, lot 214

Catalogue Note

The boldly proportioned pediment and frieze with deeply carved acanthus scrolls centering a satyr's mask is typical of the late Palladian style in English furniture design in the manner of the architect and tastemaker William Kent (d.1748).  Moulded broken triangular pediments remained a popular element for terminating bureau cabinets and bookcases well into the mid-18th century, often seen in the work of the royal cabinetmakers William Hallett (c.1707-81) and his apprentice William Vile.  A bureau cabinet with a similar pediment was in the celebrated Percival Griffiths collection, ill. Edwards and Macquoid, The Dictionary of the English Furniture (London 1954), Vol.I, p.145 fig.48, and the form was still considered sufficiently fashionable to appear in both the First (1754, pl.XLLVII) and Third (1762, pl.CVII) editions of Chippendale's Director.
Jean Flagler Matthews (d.1979) was the granddaughter of Standard Oil founder Henry Morrison Flagler (1830-1913), one of America's richest men and famous for developing Palm Beach and Miami as holiday resorts.  It was she who was responsible for saving Whitehall, Flagler's Gilded Age mansion in Palm Beach, from demolition in 1959 and overseeing its conversion into the Flagler Museum.

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York