30
30
Fry, Joshua and Peter Jefferson
A MAP OF THE MOST INHABITED PART OF VIRGINIA; CONTAINING THE WHOLE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND WITH PART OF PENSILVANIA, NEW JERSEY AND NORTH CAROLINA. LONDON: THOMAS JEFFERYS, CIRCA 1755
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 20,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
30
Fry, Joshua and Peter Jefferson
A MAP OF THE MOST INHABITED PART OF VIRGINIA; CONTAINING THE WHOLE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND WITH PART OF PENSILVANIA, NEW JERSEY AND NORTH CAROLINA. LONDON: THOMAS JEFFERYS, CIRCA 1755
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 20,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York

Fry, Joshua and Peter Jefferson
A MAP OF THE MOST INHABITED PART OF VIRGINIA; CONTAINING THE WHOLE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND WITH PART OF PENSILVANIA, NEW JERSEY AND NORTH CAROLINA. LONDON: THOMAS JEFFERYS, CIRCA 1755
Map sectioned and mounted on linen in original marbled board slipcase with contemporary manuscript label (map 49 x 31 in.; 124.5 x 78.7 cm). Engraved by Thomas Jefferys, partially handcolored in outline, cartouche by Charles Grignion after Francis Hayman depicting a wharf scene with slaves crating tobacco into barrels, some faint spotting and soiling to linen backing, but a lovely example; case a bit rubbed and faded
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Provenance

Duke of Northumberland (bookplates to case and on map verso)

Literature

Cumming, The Southeast in Early Maps, no.281; Pritchard & Taliaferro, Degrees of Latitude, no.30; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Mapping of America, p.157-158; Coolie Verner, "The Fry and Jefferson Map" in Imago Mundi, 21, 1967, pp.74-94

Catalogue Note

The first printed map of Virginia by Virginians. Thomas Jefferson boasted in his autobiography that his father's collaboration with Joshua Fry produced the "first map of Virginia which has ever been made, that of Captain Smith being merely a conjectural sketch." Of the first state only two copies are recorded (at the New York Public Library and the Alderman Library of the University of Virginia) and states 2, 3, and 4 are also of extreme rarity. This very fine example represents Verner's 4th state.

Fry and Jefferson's map dominated cartographical representations of Virginia until nearly the nineteenth century. Such was its detailed accuracy that it was used as a resource by John Mitchell and Lewis Evans to prepare their own maps of North America, which also appeared in 1755. 

The Percy copy of an immensely important map.

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York