223
223
A pair of Chinese export armorial chargers, circa 1743
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
223
A pair of Chinese export armorial chargers, circa 1743
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York

A pair of Chinese export armorial chargers, circa 1743
lavishly painted in the center with the arms of Okeover quartering Byrmingham (probably) and Leake and impaling Nichol, flanked and supported by a pair of hippocampi and pennants, the rim elaborately decorated with four rococo cartouches, either inscribed with the LMO monogram or painted with a dragon crest above a crown
diameter 12 1/2 in.; 31.7 cm
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Provenance

Collection of Colonel Sir Ian Walker-Okeover, Bt., D.S.O.
Christie's London, March 3, 1975, lot 170
Sotheby's New York, January 30, 1986, lots 299 and 300

Catalogue Note

Elaborately decorated, the Leake Okeover service is considered one of the greatest examples of Chinese export armorial services produced. The opulent service was made for Leake Okeover (1702-65), who married his wife Mary Nichol about 1730, but who died without heirs. His estate was passed on to his cousin, whose descendant, Sir Ian Walker-Okeover, Bt. sold around a hundred pieces of the service in March 1975; most of the following lots are from the above mentioned group.

The original painted design for the arms is the only recorded example for a complete armorial service known to survive, and still remains with the family. Illustrated in David S. Howard, A Tale of Three Cities: Canton, Shanghai and Hong Kong, London, 1997, p. 57, cat nos. 53 (original pattern) and 54 (an example from the service), the author discusses the method by which designs for armorial porcelain were conveyed to the painters and potters in China. While it was usual that seal fobs, drawings and bookplates were sent as design instructions, in the instance of the Okeover service, the design of the whole plate was included with meticulous attention to detail. This beautifully rendered service stands as the testament to the artistic abilities of both the East and the West, and as Howard, ibid, p. 57, concludes, 'there is no more faultless service of porcelain from China for the Western market'.

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York