268
268
Apollo 17 Large Format Lunar Surface Full Frame Hasselblad Photographs
THE LANDING SITE FROM ORBIT, LUNAR SURFACE CORE DRILLING AND CAMERA EQUIPMENT, PLUS ROVER TRAVERSES
Estimate
1,2001,800
JUMP TO LOT
268
Apollo 17 Large Format Lunar Surface Full Frame Hasselblad Photographs
THE LANDING SITE FROM ORBIT, LUNAR SURFACE CORE DRILLING AND CAMERA EQUIPMENT, PLUS ROVER TRAVERSES
Estimate
1,2001,800
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Space Exploration

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New York

Apollo 17 Large Format Lunar Surface Full Frame Hasselblad Photographs
THE LANDING SITE FROM ORBIT, LUNAR SURFACE CORE DRILLING AND CAMERA EQUIPMENT, PLUS ROVER TRAVERSES
A set of four large black and white photographs, each 11 by 14 inches, all having the watermark text of: “This Paper Manufactured by Kodak” on verso. All were printed in the 1970’s by NASA for geological and mission research.
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Catalogue Note

1) APOLLO 17 LUNAR LANDING SITE SEEN FROM ORBIT WITH CSM AMERICA VISIBLE NEAR THE FRAME CENTER. The Apollo 17 Lunar Module crew snaps Hasselblad frame AS17-147-22464 showing landing site known as the Taurus – Littrow. The touchdown point is close to the circular crater near the image center and is surrounded by large mountains along all sides. Part of the Lunar Module is the dark area on the image right side.

2) A DIFFICULT CORE TUBE REMOVAL REQUIRES GENE CERNAN TO KNEEL ON THE LUNAR SURFACE. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt takes Hasselblad frame A17-136-20695 as Commander Gene Cernan extracts a lunar core tube. A “heat flow” probe was placed into the bore hole left after core tube extraction and was part of the ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package). The probe was designed to measure lunar internal heat loss. Mountains around the Apollo 17 landing site are visible in the background.

3) LONG RANGE PHOTOS BEING MADE BY SCHMITT IN THE TAURUS-LITTROW VALLEY NEXT TO A LARGE BOULDER. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt is seen using a 500mm lens on his Hasselblad camera recording detailed images of the Taurus-Littrow mountains. This area was known as the Station 6 stop on the third and final Apollo 17 EVA which was an important destination because of the extremely large boulders. Part of the communications antenna and TV camera on the lunar rover can be seen at the left. Hasselblad frame A17-146-22293.

4) SCHMITT SNAPS A VALLEY VIEW WHILE TRAVELING ON THE LUNAR ROVER. Part of the Rover’s TV and communications antenna are visible in Hasselblad frame A17-138-2118. This image shows the direction the crew is traveling after leaving Station Stop 2 and heading toward Stop 3 during their second lunar surface exploration (EVA 2). Mountains towering above the valley can be seen in the background.

Space Exploration

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