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Flown to the Lunar Surface on Apollo 16
CHARLES "CHARLIE" DUKE'S APOLLO 16 NAVIGATIONAL LUNAR CHART
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
260
Flown to the Lunar Surface on Apollo 16
CHARLES "CHARLIE" DUKE'S APOLLO 16 NAVIGATIONAL LUNAR CHART
Estimate
12,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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Flown to the Lunar Surface on Apollo 16
CHARLES "CHARLIE" DUKE'S APOLLO 16 NAVIGATIONAL LUNAR CHART
Black & white photographic printed lunar surface map (10 ½ by 7 ¾ inches), number 18 of the 24 maps used aboard the Lunar Module Orion for navigation to the Apollo 16 landing site.
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Catalogue Note

LUNAR NAVIGATIONAL CHART FLOWN ABOARD LUNAR MODULE "ORION" TO THE LUNAR SURFACE ON APOLLO 16.

SIGNED AND INSCRIBED BY APOLLO 16 LUNAR MODULE PILOT CHARLES DUKE:  "THIS NAVIGATIONAL LUNAR CHART WAS / FLOWN TO THE LUNAR SURFACE ON / BOARD "ORION": APRIL 20-23, 1972. / CHARLES M. DUKE, JR."

Accompanied by Duke's provenance letter, which reads in part: "[This] Apollo 16 navigational chart accompanied me aboard our Lunar Module Orion to the Descartes highlands of the Moon, where it landed on April 20, 1972. The chart then spent the next three days on the surface of the Moon housed in Orion. This chart played a critical role in the success of our mission, as it was used by John Young and me to monitor our flight path across the Moon during our descent to the lunar surface!"

Duke was the tenth and youngest person to walk on the moon. During the Apollo 16 mission, he and Mission Commander John Young set the then-record for a lunar surface stay at 71 hours, during which they explored the rugged lunar highland of the Descartes region. Duke made three excursions onto the lunar surface during the mission, logging a total of 20 hours and 15 minutes of EVAs, during which he helped to collect nearly 213 lbs of moon rocks and soil samples, deployed a cosmic-ray detector, the activation of several scientific experiments, and the use of the Lunar Rover over the roughest surface on the moon.

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