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Apollo 13 Lunar Module Star Chart to Enable Leaving the Moon
USED BY THE LM CREW DURING APOLLO 13 TRAINING
Estimate
2,0003,000
JUMP TO LOT
233
Apollo 13 Lunar Module Star Chart to Enable Leaving the Moon
USED BY THE LM CREW DURING APOLLO 13 TRAINING
Estimate
2,0003,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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Apollo 13 Lunar Module Star Chart to Enable Leaving the Moon
USED BY THE LM CREW DURING APOLLO 13 TRAINING
APOLLO 13, LM LO-2 HR, 11 APRIL 70 LAUNCH. Circular Star Chart, 8 ½ inches in diameter. Consisting of 2 thin plastic discs rotating around a central rivet. The lower disc shows the Earth, sun, planets and star patterns against a black background. All these celestial bodies are plotted in their actual positons based on the Apollo 13 launch date of April 11, 1970, and are positioned either above or below lines defined as the ecliptic and the lunar equator. The upper disc is a semi-transparent overlay with six over lapping circles that correspond to viewing limits of the LM onboard telescope. The back of the chart has a square patch of Velcro at the center and an inscription in ink by Fred Haise. LM LO-2 means Lunar Module Lift Off minus 2 hours.
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Catalogue Note

INSCRIBED and SIGNED: “Used in training for Apollo 13, FRED HAISE, Apollo 13 LMP” on the chart back.

This star chart was used Fred Haise and James Lovell while training in the Lunar Module simulator. The objective was to use this chart within two hours before lift off from the lunar surface to accurately align the LM computer’s navigational equipment relative to their landing point. This was important to do because the LM’s gyroscopic guidance equipment lost precision over time. The method involved looking through the LM’s Alignment Optical Telescope (AOT) and recording the coordinates of stars visible within the six circular overlays. Those circular areas on the chart overlay showed the AOT's field of view when moved to one of the six fixed positions known as detents. The star coordinates would be used with the LM guidance computer’s Program 57 (P57) to complete the platform alignment. This would insure that their flight to rendezvous with the lunar orbiting Command/Service Module would be as accurate as possible.

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