155
155

ORIGINALLY FROM THE COLLECTION OF APOLLO 10 LUNAR MODULE PILOT EUGENE CERNAN

Apollo 10 — Flown Lunar Module Communications Operational Modes Cue Card 
A VALUABLE AND QUICK RESOURCE, PROVIDING RAPID REFERENCE FOR THE COMMUNICATIONS OPERATIONAL MODES FOR THE ASTRONAUTS' AUDIO
Estimate
1,5002,000
LOT SOLD. 5,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
155

ORIGINALLY FROM THE COLLECTION OF APOLLO 10 LUNAR MODULE PILOT EUGENE CERNAN

Apollo 10 — Flown Lunar Module Communications Operational Modes Cue Card 
A VALUABLE AND QUICK RESOURCE, PROVIDING RAPID REFERENCE FOR THE COMMUNICATIONS OPERATIONAL MODES FOR THE ASTRONAUTS' AUDIO
Estimate
1,5002,000
LOT SOLD. 5,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Space Exploration

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New York

Apollo 10 — Flown Lunar Module Communications Operational Modes Cue Card 
A VALUABLE AND QUICK RESOURCE, PROVIDING RAPID REFERENCE FOR THE COMMUNICATIONS OPERATIONAL MODES FOR THE ASTRONAUTS' AUDIO
Flown Apollo 10 Lunar Module Communications Operational Modes cue card, 2 sheets of paper mounted recto and verso on card, 4 ¾ by 7 ¼ inches, Velcro squares to verso used to affix card to module cockpit control panel, SIGNED by EUGENE CERNAN, TOM STAFFORD, and JOHN YOUNG. With a Typed Letter Signed by EUGENE CERNAN, stating the importance of the cue cards in the mission. "This LM cue card," he writes, "has remained a treasured part of my personal collection for more than thirty-five years, ever since NASA presented in back to me in 1969, shortly after my return to Earth. This complete Lunar Module Communications Cue Card remains both a historic tool from one of the manned lunar voyages, and a rare example of an astronaut flight-certified artefact returned from the Moon."   
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Catalogue Note

These cue cards were of great importance during the Apollo 10 mission.  Eugene "Gene" Cernan positioned his near the communications console on his side of the spacecraft. The reserve side of the cue card provided a visual reference for the steerable antenna gimbal functions that allowed the lunar module antenna to lock onto radio from the Manned Spaceflight Network on Earth and connected the astronauts directly to Mission Control.

This particular cue card remained a treasured part of Cernan's personal space collection for more than 35 years.

Space Exploration

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New York