105
105

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN FAMILY

A Khorossan gallery carpet, East Persia
JUMP TO LOT
105

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN FAMILY

A Khorossan gallery carpet, East Persia
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Rugs and Carpets

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London

A Khorossan gallery carpet, East Persia

Provenance

Semenzato, Venice, November 2002, lot 389
Acquired by David Halevim
Acquired by the present owner 2005

Literature

Sabahi, T., L'Arte Del Tappeto d'Oriente, Florence, 2007, p. 106
Levi, A., Alberto Levi Gallery Antica Arte Tessile IV, Milan 2003, pp. 48 & 49, pl. 23
Gantzhorn, V., Der Christlich Orientalische Teppich, 1990, p. 474
Schurman, U., Zentral-Asiatische Teppiche, 1969, p. 166, pl. 86
Achdjian, A., Le Tapis, Paris, 1949, p. 57 (half illustrated), catalogued as 'Kuba Abaran, 17th century'

Catalogue Note

EMBARGO ON IMPORTATION OF PERSIAN/IRANIAN WORKS OF ART TO THE U.S.A
Please note that there may be restrictions on importing certain types of property of Persian/Iranian origin into the United States. Clients should enquire with the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) regarding the proper importation of items subject to such restrictions. Due to recent changes in U.S. law, carpets and rugs of Iranian/Persian origin may no longer be imported into the U.S. Please contact Sotheby's if you are uncertain as to whether a lot is subject to these or any other restrictions or if you need assistance with such enquiries.

This intriguing gallery carpet has often been catalogued as a Kuba production. From the design one can see why, especially when comparing with Kuba blossom carpets, a fragment of which can be seen here, lot 7, or indeed the long rugs from the beginning of the 19th century, lot 9. However the jufti construction and the colours of dye would suggest it is both a Persian weave and indeed from Khorossan.

This carpet, much like the fragment of the medallion carpet, lot 60, is an example of the transient nature of carpet designs which passed from East to West and vice versa. When considering 16th century Iznik pottery tiles, see Sotheby’s London, 24 October 2017, lot 269 for an example, we can see a relationship between the glazed open blossoms, trellised vinery and splayed leaves seen in the drawing of the present lot.  The origins and nature of these relationships, and whether they were accidental or purposeful, triggered by the movement of objects, craftsmen, or both,  remains something of a mystery but is interesting to note that 16th century Ottoman tile production, 17th century Eastern Persian carpets, and early 19th East Caucasian carpets can have such connections in design. 

An example of a Khorossan carpet which has recently appeared in auction with similar deep blue field and palmettes flanked by splayed leaves, joined by vertical vines, sadly in a heavily repaired state, see the carpet formerly in the collection of Argine Benaki Salvago, Sotheby’s London, 7 November, 2017, lot 15. A further example sold in the Bernheimer sale, Christie's London, 14 February 1996, lot 7, this carpet more akin to the design of the offered lot with similar field incorporating rosettes and vines with splayed leaves.

Rugs and Carpets

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London