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Antonio Joli
FLORENCE, A VIEW OF THE PONTE SANTA TRINITA AND THE RIVER FROM THE LUNGARNO GUICCIARDINI
JUMP TO LOT
20
Antonio Joli
FLORENCE, A VIEW OF THE PONTE SANTA TRINITA AND THE RIVER FROM THE LUNGARNO GUICCIARDINI
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Masters Evening Sale

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London

Antonio Joli
MODENA 1700 - 1777 NAPLES
FLORENCE, A VIEW OF THE PONTE SANTA TRINITA AND THE RIVER FROM THE LUNGARNO GUICCIARDINI

Provenance

A Winchester College schoolmaster (c. 1885–1955);

By whom bequeathed to his god-daughter Margaret 'Meg' Brodhurst, daughter of his colleague Harry Altham and wife of another, Arthur Hugh 'Podge' Brodhurst (1916–2006).

Catalogue Note

This is one of only a handful of views of Florence by Antonio Joli, one of the most peripatetic and admired artists of the eighteenth century. Although born in Modena, Joli would spend most of his life travelling around Italy and even further afield to Germany, Spain and to England, where he would gain a fine reputation as a set-designer and vedutista

As a young man he travelled to Rome, where he studied the vedute and capricci of Giovanni Paolo Panini, under whom he almost certainly trained, and of Gaspar van Wittel. By 1718 he must have established himself in the Città Eterna for he was granted the important commission to decorate the Villa Patrizi in Rome, and by 20 April 1719 he had become a member of the Accademia di San Luca. He is first documented in Venice in the Spring of 1732 and here, once again, he would study and assimilate the style of the leading vedutisti, namely Canaletto, Marieschi and Carlevarijs: indeed Joli would come to be called 'il Canaletto napoletano'.

This view of the Arno is based on Giuseppe Zocchi's drawing in the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York.1 The topographical details have for the most part been repeated faithfully but the staffage differs considerably. The view was taken from what is now the Lungarno Guicciardini in front of the palazzo belonging to the Capponi family (as confirmed by the inscription on the Morgan drawing), and the building at the end of the bridge is Palazzo Frescobaldi. Zocchi also produced a painting based on his drawing which is today in the Thyssen Collection, Madrid.2 The painting closely follows the drawing, including the disposition of the staffage, but does take some liberties in the topographical details and includes the campanile and the cupola of the duomo, which is omitted from the present work, confirming that Joli based his design on the drawing or engraving (fig. 1), rather than Zucchi's painting.

Zocchi's drawing is one of twenty-four views of Florence engraved in 1744 by Giuseppe Allegrini with the title Scelta di XXIV vedute delle principali Contrade, Piazze, Chiese e Palazzi della città di Firenze and dedicated to his patron Marchese Andrea Gerini and Marie-Thérèse of Austria.

1 E. Evans Dee, View of Florence and Tuscany by Giuseppe Zocchi, exhibition catalogue, New York 1971, n.p., cat. no. 8, reproduced plate F8.

2 M. Gregori and S. Blasio, Firenze nella pittura e nel disegno dal Trecento al Settecento, Milan 1994, p. 192, reproduced in colour pp. 198–99, fig. 251.

Old Masters Evening Sale

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London