210
210

PROPERTY FROM A UK PRIVATE COLLECTION

Circle of William Marlow
LONDON, A VIEW OF THE THAMES WITH OLD WESTMINSTER BRIDGE, WESTMINSTER ABBEY, THE YORK BUILDINGS WATER TOWER, AND THE ADELPHI
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
210

PROPERTY FROM A UK PRIVATE COLLECTION

Circle of William Marlow
LONDON, A VIEW OF THE THAMES WITH OLD WESTMINSTER BRIDGE, WESTMINSTER ABBEY, THE YORK BUILDINGS WATER TOWER, AND THE ADELPHI
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Masters Day Sale

|
London

Circle of William Marlow
LONDON, A VIEW OF THE THAMES WITH OLD WESTMINSTER BRIDGE, WESTMINSTER ABBEY, THE YORK BUILDINGS WATER TOWER, AND THE ADELPHI

Provenance

Granville Bevan (1867–1950), Chipstead Park;
Thence by descent.

Catalogue Note

This view of the riverfront is taken from where Waterloo Bridge stands today. It depicts several now lost London landmarks: old Westminster Bridge, the tower of the York Buildings Waterworks Company, and the Adelphi. The Adelphi was a highly ambitious, imaginative development by the Adam architect siblings, and was an ingenious piece of self-promotion, its name deriving from the Greek for 'brothers.' In 1768 the Adams took a lease on the site and obtained an Act of Parliament which enabled them to reclaim part of the river, on which they built a vast network of brick vaults, topped by a grand terrace of private houses. The building was conceived as a whole, with pilasters articulating the centre and each end, and was surrounded by streets named after the brothers: Robert, James, William, John and Adam.

Residences in the Adelphi were allocated by lottery, each ticket costing £50. Among the many fashionable tenants was the actor David Garrick, who moved into number 5, one of the central houses, in April 1772. The landscape by Jan Both - lot 160 in this sale - once formed part of Garrick's collection and must have hung in the house depicted here, where Garrick died in 1779 and his widow continued to live for another 43 years.

The construction of the Adelphi is recorded in several paintings by William Marlow, such as the signed work in the Museum of London.1 The Adelphi was demolished in its entirety (except for 7 Adam Street) in 1936, and Colcutt and Hamp's massive Art Deco office block, Adelphi House, erected in 1938, still occupies the site.

1 Inv. no. A25874; see M. Galinou and J. Hayes, London in paint. Oil paintings in the collection at the Museum of London, London 1996, pp. 83–85, cat. no. 27, reproduced in colour pp. 82–83.

Old Masters Day Sale

|
London