116
116

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

Bonifazio de' Pitati, called Bonifazio Veronese
THE HOLY FAMILY WITH THE INFANT SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST AND MARY MAGDALEN
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116

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

Bonifazio de' Pitati, called Bonifazio Veronese
THE HOLY FAMILY WITH THE INFANT SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST AND MARY MAGDALEN
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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Bonifazio de' Pitati, called Bonifazio Veronese
VERONA 1487 - 1553 VENICE
THE HOLY FAMILY WITH THE INFANT SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST AND MARY MAGDALEN

Provenance

With J.E. Goedhart, Amsterdam, by 1898;
Dr. Richard von Schnitzler (1855–1938), Cologne, by 1918;
Anonymous sale, Lucerne, Galerie Fischer, 29–30 June 1973, lot 86;
Where acquired by the parents of the present owner.

Exhibited

Cologne, Kunstverein, Alte Kunst aus Kölner Privatbesitz: Renaissance und Barock, November 1929, no. 4.

Literature

E. Lüthgen and W. Bombe, Die Sammlung Dr. Richard von Schnitzler, Leipzig 1918, p. 63, reproduced fig. 3;
O.H. Förster, Die Sammlung Dr. Richard von Schnitzler, Munich 1931, p. 38, cat. no. 57, reproduced pl. XXXII, fig. 57.

Catalogue Note

Bonifazio Veronese's perennial interest in the Sacra Conversazione was conceived in the workshop of his great Venetian master, Palma Vecchio (1480–1528). Bonifazio's interest in the genre so associated with Palma continued throughout his independent career, and it seems clear that he and his workshop actively sought to fulfill the demand for such paintings that had been generated by his mentor and Titian (1488–1576). We are grateful to Prof. Peter Humfrey for endorsing the attribution of the present work to Bonifazio, and for dating it to the mid-1530s.

The Madonna and Child attended by a group of saints was an extremely popular subject, particularly in Venice, due to the adaptability of the figures represented, which could be interchanged to suit the requirements of the patron, in a domestic or ecclesiastical context. The setting of the 'holy communion' also became flexible. Having largely been situated within church architecture, in the paintings of artists such as Cima da Conegliano (1459–1517), the sacred company was transported to the pastoral landscape of the Veneto. Such is the case here, although the green curtain behind the Madonna retains a sense of architectural structure and symmetry, a feature common to many of Bonifazio's works most indebted to Palma; see, for example, the painting in the Palazzo Pitti, Florence of the early 1520s.1

1 Inv. no. 84; see B. Berenson, Italian Pictures of the Renaissance. Venetian School, London 1957, vol. I, p. 42, reproduced vol. II, pl. 1137.

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