252
252

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF PROFESSOR EGBERT HAVERKAMP-BEGEMANN

Leendert van der Cooghen
MARS SEEN FROM BEHIND
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 56,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
252

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF PROFESSOR EGBERT HAVERKAMP-BEGEMANN

Leendert van der Cooghen
MARS SEEN FROM BEHIND
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 56,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master Drawings including the Collection of Professor Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann

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New York

Leendert van der Cooghen
HAARLEM 1632 - 1681
MARS SEEN FROM BEHIND
Black chalk and brown and gray wash, within black chalk framing lines, indented for transfer;
signed with initials in black chalk, lower left: LVC and dated upper left: 1664-
bears numbering in brown ink, verso: N82
179 by 117 mm; 7 1/8  by 4 5/8  in
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Possibly Jean Bernard, Amsterdam,
possibly his sale, Amsterdam, De Vries...Roos, 24ff., November 1834, Album N, lot 1 ("Een krijgsman met een helm op het hoofd, meesterlijk en fraai met zw. Kr. En O.I. Inkt;");
Bert E Sternfeld, Aerdenhout, by 1987,
from whom acquired by the late owner 

Literature

B.L. Coenen, 'The Drawings of the Haarlem Amateur Leendert van der Cooghen,' Master Drawings, vol. XLIII, no. 1 (2005), pp. 31 and 63-64, cat. no. A6, reproduced, p. 35, fig. 37

Catalogue Note

The present sheet, executed by the talented Haarlem based amateur, Leendert van der Cooghen, is undoubtedly the most significant work to have appeared on the market by the artist in recent years. Depicting Mars seen from behind, the drawing is a great rarity even within the context of Cooghen’s small graphic oeuvre, due to the fact that it was created in preparation for the artist’s etching of the same subject (fig.1), one of only three works from his corpus of drawings known to function in this fashion.

Both the Haverkamp-Begemann drawing and the resulting etching are predated by an impressive sheet in the collection of Lord Cavendish at Holker Hall, depicting the Battle between the Horatii and Curiatii.1 Dating to 1658, the Cavendish drawing must have pleased Cooghen, who subsequently reused the figure of a soldier seen from behind, from the right side of the composition, as a template for the present work, which dates to 1664.

History had, until recently, remembered Cooghen as something of an artistic dilettante, thanks in part to Arnold Houbraken’s entry for the artist in the first volume of De groote schouburgh der Nederlantsche konstchilders en schilderessen. Here Houbraken describes in somewhat humorous terms, that Cooghen "did not have to paint to earn his living.....only if he felt like it" which resulted, somewhat predictably, in the artist not making “as many works as would have made him famous outside his native town of Haarlem.”2 It is quite true that Cooghen’s graphic oeuvre is incredibly slim, with Coenen (see Literature), accepting only three paintings, some sixty six drawings, and ten etchings by the artist.3 However, despite this small body of work, it is quite clear that Cooghen was, in fact, a highly accomplished artist, whose surviving drawings, in particular, attest to his consistently high artistic standards.

1. Coenen, op. cit., p. 59, no. A45, reproduced, p. 34, fig. 36
2. Ibid., p. 5
3. Ibid.

Old Master Drawings including the Collection of Professor Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann

|
New York