128
128
Federico Zuccaro
TWO MEN, ONE PLAYING A LUTE AND ONE READING AND A BOY SEATED IN A LANDSCAPE
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
128
Federico Zuccaro
TWO MEN, ONE PLAYING A LUTE AND ONE READING AND A BOY SEATED IN A LANDSCAPE
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master Drawings including the Collection of Professor Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann

|
New York

Federico Zuccaro
SANT' ANGELO IN VADO, MARCHES 1540/42 - 1609 ANCONA
TWO MEN, ONE PLAYING A LUTE AND ONE READING AND A BOY SEATED IN A LANDSCAPE
Pen and brown ink, within partial black chalk framing lines;
inscribed in brown ink, upper centre: questo dal N... and in another later hand in brown ink: homme en apparendant and; bears old attribution verso (largely obscured): del zu... 
188 by 289 mm; 7½ by 11 3/8  in
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Provenance

With William H. Schab, New York,
where purchased in December 1966

Exhibited

Long Island University, Hillwood Art Gallery, Drawing the Fine Line: Discovering European Drawings, 1986, pp. 14-15;
Milwaukee Art Museum and New York, National Academy of Design, Renaissance into Baroque: Italian Master Drawings by the Zuccari, 1550-1600, 1989-90, cat. no. 74, reproduced 

Catalogue Note

The attribution to Federico was first proposed by Konrad Oberhuber.  In the 1986 exhibition catalogue, Gail Davidson suggested that the drawing must date to the mid to late 1570s, when Federico was in Florence.  At this time, he made many drawings from life, giving a fascinating insight into his own daily life, and the people he knew and met during his outings in the surroundings of Florence, especially during the years 1576-77, when he regularly visited the Badia of Vallombrosa, and executed there a distinctive and important series of portraits in red and black chalk.

This spontaneous scene is instead drawn solely in pen and ink, in a controlled but fluid style that can be compared to other drawings by the artist.  James Mundy points out the similarities with a drawing at Chatsworth, Allegory of the Arts, which is similarly executed with parallel, if slightly dryer, strokes in pen and ink.1  

1. Chatsworth, inv. no. 205; see M. Jaffé, The Devonshire Collection of Italian Drawings, Roman and Neapolitan Schools, London 1994, p. 239, no. 385, reproduced

Old Master Drawings including the Collection of Professor Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann

|
New York