124
124
Jacob Simonsz. van der Does
SHEEP GRAZING AMONG CLASSICAL MONUMENTS
Estimate
2,5003,500
JUMP TO LOT
124
Jacob Simonsz. van der Does
SHEEP GRAZING AMONG CLASSICAL MONUMENTS
Estimate
2,5003,500
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master & British Works on Paper

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London

Jacob Simonsz. van der Does
AMSTERDAM 1623 - 1673 SLOTEN
SHEEP GRAZING AMONG CLASSICAL MONUMENTS
Black chalk and grey wash, within brown ink framing lines;
signed, lower edge, left of centre, in black chalk: JvDoes and inscribed, on the two monuments: HIC SITA EST AMYMONE MARCI OPTIMA ET PVLCHERIMALANIFICA . PIA. PUDICA. FRVGI CASTA DONIISEDA on the stone to the left, and TVRCIVS / APRONIANVS / V.C / PRAEF. VRBI / CVRAVIT on the central monument;
bears inscription in brown ink, on verso of backing: 1803 P 37 / 29 . N 134 
259 by 407 mm
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Provenance

Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830), London (L.2445);
Probably purchased after Lawrence’s death, together with the rest of his collection, in 1834 by Samuel Woodburn, London;
Probably William Esdaile (1758-1837), London (L.2617, apparently partially visible at lower right corner of the sheet, and with typical shelf marks, verso);
Possibly Charles Fairfax Murray, London;
Adelbert Salusbery Cockayne-Cust, 5th Baron Brownlow (1867–1927), Belton House, Lincolnshire;
Prince Wladimir Nicolaievitch Argoutinsky-Dolgoroukoff (1875-1941), St. Petersburg and Paris (L.2602d),
his sale, Amsterdam, R.W.P. de Vries, 27 March 1925, lot 101;
Iohan Quirijn van Regteren Altena (1899-1980), Amsterdam (L.4617),
by whose heirs sold, Amsterdam, Christie's, 10 December 2014, lot 262;
bears another unidentified collector's mark, verso (not in Lugt)

Catalogue Note

A pupil of Claes Moyaert in Amsterdam, Jacob Simonsz. van der Does also studied in Leiden before completing his training in Rome, where he spent the latter half of the 1640s and was given the Bentveughels nickname ‘Tamboer’ (‘Drummer Boy’). The biographer Arnold Houbraken writes of him that he spent several years in Rome ‘industriously painting and drawing’ before returning to Holland, around 1650. Van der Does settled in The Hague, where he was involved in the foundation of the Confrerie Pictura in 1656, but was back in Amsterdam by 1663.

The present sheet is a fine and typical example of Jacob van der Does’s mature draughtsmanship. The Latin inscriptions on the slab at the left and on the monument in the centre are based on a funerary inscription on a Roman tomb dating from the 1st century BC, which the artist must have seen and transcribed during his stay in Italy. The original inscription reads: ‘Hic sita est Amymone, matrona Marci, optima et pulcherrima, lanifica pia pudica frugi casta domiseda.’ (‘Here lies Amymone, wife of Marcus, best and most beautiful, a worker in wool, devoted, modest, frugal, chaste, one who stayed at home.’) As Schatborn has pointed out, ‘Van der Does was evidently an educated man with an interest in Roman inscriptions [and] was familiar with several languages.’1

1.  P. Schatborn, Drawn to Warmth: 17th-century Dutch artists in Italy, exhib. cat., Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, 2001, p. 136

Old Master & British Works on Paper

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