103
103

PROPERTY FROM A PRINCELY COLLECTION

Gold and enamel Nelson memorial ring commemorating the death of Admiral Nelson at Trafalgar, early 19th century
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 7,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
103

PROPERTY FROM A PRINCELY COLLECTION

Gold and enamel Nelson memorial ring commemorating the death of Admiral Nelson at Trafalgar, early 19th century
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 7,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Of Royal and Noble Descent

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London

Gold and enamel Nelson memorial ring commemorating the death of Admiral Nelson at Trafalgar, early 19th century
the enamel rectangular bezel decorated with the gothic letters 'N' for Nelson surmounted by a Viscount's coronet and a 'B' for Bronte surmounted by a ducal coronet with Trafalgar below, the reverse inscribed 'Lost to this Country 21 Oct 1805 aged 47', the shank engraved ' Palman Qui Meruit Ferat' (let him bear the palm of victory who has won it).
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Provenance

Sotheby’s London, Trafalgar: Nelson and the Napoleonic Wars, 5 October 2005, lot 206

Literature

After the death of Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson at the battle of Trafalgar on the 21st October 1805, memorial rings were distributed by his executors, the Rt. Hon. Earl Nelson and J. Haselwood, to relatives, personal friends and the pall bearers. Enamelled in black with a white border, each was decorated with the letters N for Nelson surmounted by a viscount’s coronet with seven pearls to commemorate Nelson’s appointment as viscount after the battle of the Nile in 1798, and B for Bronte surmounted by a ducal coronet, representing the Sicilian dukedom of Bronte conferred by Ferdinand IV of the Two Sicilies in 1799, with Trafalgar beneath. The hoops were engraved to the outside with ‘PALMAN QUI MERUIT FERAT’ (Let him bear the palm of victory who has won it) which was granted to Nelson in 1778 and taken from the poem ‘Ad ventos’ written by John Jotin in 1727.

The rings were originally presented in red morocco leather cases containing a label with the name of the maker, John Salter of the Strand London, a silversmith who had served with the Admiral. Approximately fifty-eight of these memorial rings were distributed by the executors of Nelson’s will, thirty-one going to members of Nelson’s immediate family, while a manuscript held in the British Museum lists the original recipients of the rings. Others have since come to light making the present number unknown. The ring was hugely popular making it likely Salter produced further examples on request.

Of Royal and Noble Descent

|
London