300
300
Palestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da
OFFERTORIA TOTIUS ANNI, SECUNDUM SANCTAE ROMANAE ECCLESIAE, CONSUETUDINEM, QUINQUE VOCIBUS CONCINENDA...PARS PRIMA [...SECUNDA], ROME: FRANCESCO COATTINO, 1593
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT
300
Palestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da
OFFERTORIA TOTIUS ANNI, SECUNDUM SANCTAE ROMANAE ECCLESIAE, CONSUETUDINEM, QUINQUE VOCIBUS CONCINENDA...PARS PRIMA [...SECUNDA], ROME: FRANCESCO COATTINO, 1593
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Music, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental Books

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Palestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da
OFFERTORIA TOTIUS ANNI, SECUNDUM SANCTAE ROMANAE ECCLESIAE, CONSUETUDINEM, QUINQUE VOCIBUS CONCINENDA...PARS PRIMA [...SECUNDA], ROME: FRANCESCO COATTINO, 1593
FIRST EDITION, 'Pars prima' (2 parts only: Quintus & Bassus)--'Pars secunda' (ALL 5 PARTS: Cantus, Altus, Tenor, Bassus & Quintus), titles with woodcut device and borders, dedications, typeset music, comprising 40 and 28 pieces respectively 

7 volumes, 4to (c.20.5 x 16cm), 'Pars prima' each 22 leaves, 'Pars secunda' the Cantus 16 leaves (the rest 15), "picador" and "key" watermarks, disbound, Altus, Tenor, Quintus & Bassus parts in 'Pars secunda' lacking index at end, some tears to Cantus repaired and restored, slightly affecting the text, worming to hinges in Quintus reinforced, a few small wormholes and staining


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Literature

RISM P 746 & P 749 (5 copies); Edit 16: CNCE 44837 and CNCE 44839 (4 copies); G. Reese, Music in the Renaissance (1959), pp.465-467

Catalogue Note

RARE: sets of all five parts for sixteenth-century polyphonic music are of the greatest rarity at auction.  Palestrina was certainly the most highly regarded composer of his era, particularly of sacred music, and remains "one of the three greatest composers of the twilight period in Renaissance music, the other two being Lassus and Byrd" (Reese, p.459). These two books issued in 1593 contain all Palestrina's sixty-eight known Offertories. With those by Lassus, they constitute the first substantial corpus of polyphonic settings, and earliest to have been written in free motet style rather than based on plainchant. "The Offertories are rich in felicitous touches of many kinds...as elsewhere, Palestrina differentiates himself from earlier masters such as Josquin by his easily discernible sensitivity to tonality" (Reese, p.466).  

Music, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental Books

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London