282
282
Lully, Jean-Baptiste
ARMIDE, TRAGÉDIE MISE EN MUSIQUE [FULL SCORE], PARIS: CHRISTOPHE BALLARD, 1686, WITH MUSICAL ANNOTATIONS AND AUTHORIZED WITH THE COMPOSER'S PARAPH AT END  
Estimate
4,0005,000
JUMP TO LOT
282
Lully, Jean-Baptiste
ARMIDE, TRAGÉDIE MISE EN MUSIQUE [FULL SCORE], PARIS: CHRISTOPHE BALLARD, 1686, WITH MUSICAL ANNOTATIONS AND AUTHORIZED WITH THE COMPOSER'S PARAPH AT END  
Estimate
4,0005,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Music, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental Books

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Lully, Jean-Baptiste
ARMIDE, TRAGÉDIE MISE EN MUSIQUE [FULL SCORE], PARIS: CHRISTOPHE BALLARD, 1686, WITH MUSICAL ANNOTATIONS AND AUTHORIZED WITH THE COMPOSER'S PARAPH AT END  
FIRST EDITION. lxii & 271 pages, folio (c.36.5 X 24cm), type-set music, woodcut title-device, act-headpieces and ornaments, modern antique-style calf, WITH SOME CONTEMPORARY EDITORIAL CORRECTIONS AND ALTERATIONS TO THE MUSIC, additional figuring of the continuo bass, ownership inscriptions to title ("Le Miere"), one deleted, some browning, small tears to margins, worming to top corner of the final six leaves
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Literature

LWV 71; Hirsch, ii 530; RISM L 2954; Hoboken, xvi 166

Catalogue Note

The final paraph, which is also found in both copies of the first edition in the British Library, is probably in the hand of the composer.  For a similar example, see Sotheby's 9 December 1999, lot 165.

Armide is an tragédie in 5 acts with prologue, the text by P. Quinault, based on Torquato Tasso's epic poem Gerusalemme liberata, apparently selected by Lully's patron, Louis XIV, from among several offered by Quinault. Regarded as one of the composer's greatest masterpieces, Armide was first performed in Paris at the Académie Royale de Musique ("Opéra") on 15 February 1686. It was one of Lully’s last works and, unlike most of his operas, concentrates on the sustained psychological development of a single character.

The soprano Marie-Jeanne Lemière is known to have performed Armide in the 1761 revival supervised by Francoeur. Though Francoeur heavily revised the work and Lemiere would therefore not have used this score towards those performances, this is possibly her copy.

Music, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental Books

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