168
168
Michael Andrews
PORTRAIT OF VICTOR WILLING AT THE SEASIDE
JUMP TO LOT
168
Michael Andrews
PORTRAIT OF VICTOR WILLING AT THE SEASIDE
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern & Post-War British Art

|
London

Michael Andrews
1928-1995
PORTRAIT OF VICTOR WILLING AT THE SEASIDE

Provenance

Marlborough Fine Art Ltd, London
Barbara Lloyd
Private Collection, UK
Sale, Bonhams London, 17th March 2010, lot 50, where acquired by the present owner

Exhibited

London, Hayward Gallery, Michael Andrews, 31st October 1980 - 11th January 1981, cat. no.65, illustrated p.63, where lent by Barbara Lloyd (as Study of Head for a Group of Figures), with tour to Fruit Market Gallery, Edinburgh and Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester;
London, Tate, Michael Andrews, 19th July - 7th October 2001, cat. no.26, illustrated p.92 (as Study of a Head for a Group of Figures No 7). 

Catalogue Note

‘All true appreciations of people are bound to be blurred…Finding a bit here, a bit there, it’s all approximate. Everything is ‘more or less’ in my opinion’ (Michael Andrews, quoted in William Feaver and Paul Moorhouse, Michael Andrews, London, Tate Publishing, 2001, exh. cat., p.14).

The present work depicts Victor Willing, a fellow class-mate of Michael Andrews at the Slade. It was painted whilst on a holiday when Victor Willing placed his head in a face-in-hole board and Andrews caught the moment in this work.

It is a study for the model in the left panel of the triptych Good and Bad at Games (1964-8) now in the collection of the National Museum of Australia. This work was the last of a series of works known as ‘the party paintings’ which explored how people affect each other's behaviour. Good and Bad at Games depicts the psychology of social interaction at parties - the triptych shows the party at three moments during which the varied moods of the subjects are depicted. Some figures, such as Victor Willing grow in confidence whilst others diminish. The work was influenced by a photograph of a group of Giacometti sculptures on the Arts Council Private View Card for the 1967 Tate Exhibition.

Modern & Post-War British Art

|
London