412
412
Lee Man Fong
BUFFALO AND BOY
Estimate
600,000900,000
LOT SOLD. 750,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
412
Lee Man Fong
BUFFALO AND BOY
Estimate
600,000900,000
LOT SOLD. 750,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art

|
Hong Kong

Lee Man Fong
1913-1988
BUFFALO AND BOY
Signed in Chinese and stamped with a seal of the artist
Oil on masonite board
122 by 60 cm; 48 by 23 1/2  in.
Executed circa 1960s.
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Provenance

Acquired directly from the artist
Private Collection, Singapore

Catalogue Note

Chinese-born Lee Man Fong spent the majority of his life in Southeast Asia, though he crossed continents to learn Western art in the Netherlands. His art was a unique blend of east and west, ubiquitously known as ‘Eastern-style’ oil painting, or ‘Nanyang Style of the East’. He adopted the shading and anatomical depictions of Western art with masterly verisimilitude, and gracefully fused this with Chinese stylistic and perspectival nuances, paying homage to his heritage.

 

In the present lot, Lee depicts two children seated on buffaloes. However, the composition of the landscape, and its rocky mountain terrain with long, sinuous tree branches, are reminiscent of traditional Shan Shui painting style. The brawny and well-built buffaloes, emphasized by Lee’s use of strong undulating outlines, are juxtaposed against the lithe and nimble figures on their backs. The girl in the foreground uses a tree branch as a makeshift bullwhip, highlighting her child-like innocence and imagination. She looks towards the distance, calling out excitedly to the boy in the douli, a farmer’s hat, who responds with an enthusiastic wave. 

 

The illusion of space and depth is created through the faded, lighter tones beyond the edge of the delineated terrain. Meanwhile, translucent blue hues form a shroud of mist that embrace the subjects in a dream-like state.  Lee’s pulsating brushstrokes and warm palette of colors produce a work of art brimming with atmosphere and mood. By assimilating his western approach with his deep-seated attachment to his Chinese heritage, he is truly the embodiment of the reformist Chinese painter.

Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art

|
Hong Kong