66
66

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, MONACO

Jitish Kallat
DAWN CHORUS 9
JUMP TO LOT
66

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, MONACO

Jitish Kallat
DAWN CHORUS 9
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art

|
London

Jitish Kallat
B. 1974
DAWN CHORUS 9
Quantity: 3
Titled 'Dawn Chorus - 9' upper left and further signed, dated and titled '- 2007 JITISH KALLAT - DAWN CHORUS - 9' on reverse
Acrylic on canvas with two bronze sculptures
Canvas: 243.5 x 203.5 cm. (95 ⅞ x 80 ¼ in.); bronze sculptures: 17.2 x 16.5 x 47.6 cm. (6 ¾ x 6 ½ x 18 ¾ in.)
Painted in 2007
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Provenance

Acquired from Albion Gallery, London, 19 November 2007

Exhibited

London, Albion Gallery, Jitish Kallat: Unclaimed Baggage, 10 October - 19 November 2007

Literature

M. Price, Jitish Kallat: Unclaimed Baggage, Albion, London, 2007, illustration p. 59

Catalogue Note

Jitish Kallat’s Dawn Chorus series reflects upon the socio-economic effects of globalisation on the city of Mumbai. Dawn Chorus foregrounds the disadvantaged and their daily grind, a result of living in the most populous city in India. Based on photographic images, the paintings in Dawn Chorus depict the faces of young boys who Kallat saw selling popular international books at street traffic lights in Mumbai.  Given the monumental size and the colour palette of the canvases, the paintings resemble city billboards, an abundant feature in the landscape of the city. The artist mounts his canvases on bronze sculptures that are recreations of gargoyles that adorn the city’s 130-year-old Victoria Terminus train station.

Central to Dawn Chorus 9, as in the other paintings in the series, is the compelling image of the boys’ hair wherein a single figure becomes a composite of many stories. Everyday imagery, traffic, people and animals pile up like a crumbling cascade of narratives, as if the hair was a manifestation of their inner exchanges.

Kallat speaks with great admiration of the book-selling children who readily navigate this metropolis: “The children sell these books with self-assured rigour. Often illiterate, they would offer a long sermon about the merits of the book. To me these young children almost become like mascots for the resilience of [a] tough city such as Mumbai. Above the forehead are rendered a thousand colliding stories; a complex narrative of 18 million people living on a tiny island of 468 square kilometres”. (J. Kallat quoted in Jitish Kallat: 365 Lives, Arario Gallery, Beijing, 2007, p. 26)

 

Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art

|
London