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Details & Cataloguing

Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels

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Geneva

Natural pearl, emerald, enamel and diamond necklace, René Lalique, circa 1905, and a pair of earrings
Of palmette design, applied with light green plique-à-jour and black enamel, the glass panels depicting a women in profile, alternating with a collet-set cabochon emerald supporting a slightly baroque natural pearl and circular-cut diamonds, inner circumference approximately 310mm, signed Lalique, French and Russian import marks for gold, central glass panel deficient; the pair of earrings later realised using links from the necklace, screw back fittings, one diamond deficient, case signed Lalique.
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Accompanied by SSEF report no. 103605, stating that the pearls were found to be natural, saltwater.

Literature

Cf.: David Bennett & Daniela Mascetti, Understanding Jewellery, UK 1989, pg. 256, plate 411 for an image of a bracelet of similar design.

Catalogue Note

The Female Form in Art Nouveau Jewellery

"The greatest innovation was the introduction of the female form into jewellery. For centuries, with the exception of cameos, intaglios and miniatures, the depicting of the female figure had been excluded from jewels, as if women hated, or considered bad taste, the idea of adorning themselves with the features of another. Art nouveau made the woman's profile, and the naked, sensuous female body, its emblems, and the fin de siècle woman, now concious of her new position on society and of her femininity, wore such jewels with enthusiasm."

Excerpt from David Bennet & Daniela Mascetti, Understanding Jewellery

Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels

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Geneva