76
76

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF THE RT. HON. LORD HUTCHINSON OF LULLINGTON, Q.C.

Duncan Grant
TENTS
JUMP TO LOT
76

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF THE RT. HON. LORD HUTCHINSON OF LULLINGTON, Q.C.

Duncan Grant
TENTS
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Made in Britain

|
London

Duncan Grant
1885-1978
TENTS

Provenance

Acquired by Mary Hutchinson in 1914 and thence by descent to the late owner

Exhibited

London, Wallace Collection, XXth Venice Biennale International, 1940, cat. no.133;
London, Academy Hall, 40 Years of Modern Art. A Selection from British Collections, 1948, illustrated pl.18;
London, Tate, Duncan Grant: A Retrospective Exhibition, 1959, cat. no.29, with Arts Council Tour;
London, Tate, The Art of Bloomsbury: Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant, 4th November 1999 - 30th January 2000, cat. no.73, illustrated p.150, with tour to The Huntington, San Marino and Yale Center for British Art, New Haven.

Literature

Roger Fry, Duncan Grant, Hogarth Press, London, 1923, illustrated pl.7;
Raymond Mortimer, Duncan Grant, Penguin Modern Painters, Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, 1944, illustrated pl.2.

Catalogue Note

We are grateful to Richard Shone for his kind assistance with the cataloguing of the present work. 

‘Are you seriously on the look out for a Duncan?... there is what I consider a very good one going – tents and trees; I suppose it costs about twenty pounds’. (Clive Bell, letter to Mary Hutchinson, 16 July 1914, Humanities Research Center, University of Texas).

In August 1913, Grant joined a large camping party at Brandon near Thetford on the Suffolk/Norfolk border. Several tents were set up at the edge of a field and campers included Maynard Keynes who was there for the 12 day duration of the trip as well as Clive and Vanessa Bell, Roger Fry, Adrian Stephen and Molly MacCarthy. The gathering proved to be particularly inspirational and Grant painted two versions of the present work, the other slightly looser with a more naturalistic colour palette. Vanessa Bell completed Summer Camp (1913, Private Collection) and later one of her most successful designs for the Omega Workshops: Painted Omega Screen (Tents and Figures) (1913, Victoria and Albert Museum, London). The underlying geometry and confident brushwork of the present painting immediately reveal Grant’s knowledge and understanding of avant-garde developments in France and most notably the lessons of Cézanne which he assimilated into his own dynamic style, seen here at its best. 

Made in Britain

|
London