26
26
Richard Parkes Bonington
THE SUNKEN ROAD WITH A DISTANT VIEW OF ST. OMER, FRANCE
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 42,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
26
Richard Parkes Bonington
THE SUNKEN ROAD WITH A DISTANT VIEW OF ST. OMER, FRANCE
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 42,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Line of Beauty: Drawings from the Collection of Howard and Saretta Barnet

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New York

Richard Parkes Bonington
ARNOLD 1801 - 1828 LONDON
THE SUNKEN ROAD WITH A DISTANT VIEW OF ST. OMER, FRANCE
Point of the brush and brown wash over traces of pencil
129 by 214 mm; 5 1/8  by 8½ in
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Probably Lewis Brown (d. 1836);
his sale, Paris, 17-18 April 1837, lot 36 or 48;
Ferdinand-Victor-Amedée, Comte de Faucigny-Lucinge (1789-1866);
possibly Léopold Fleming;
Jules Michelin,
his sale, Paris, Hôtel Drouot, 21-23 April 1898, lot 257;
sale, Paris, Georges Petit, 16-19 June 1919, lot 54;
with Percy Moore Turner (1877-1950);
A.C. Hampson;
sale, London, Christie's, 18 March 1980, lot 84, bt. Reed;
with Anthony Reed, London;
Private Collection, London, by 1982;
with Anthony Reed, London,
where acquired in 1989

Exhibited

New York, Davis & Langdale Company, Inc., British Watercolors, Oil Sketches and Sculpture, 1989, no. 26;
New Haven, Yale Center for British Art; Paris, Petit Palais, On the Pleasure of Painting, 1991-92, no. 27

Literature

A. Dubuisson and C.E. Hughes, Richard Parkes Bonington: His Life and Work, London 1924, p. 199;
The Hon. A. Shirley, Bonington, London 1940, p. 95, no. 146 (as Mantes);
P. Noon, Richard Parkes Bonington, The Complete Paintings, New Haven 2008, p. 147, no. 91

Catalogue Note

This watercolor depicts a distant view of St. Omer, Normandy from the south-east. To the right of the Boulogne-Calais road, two travellers can be seen resting while, a little way off, a horse and cart trundles over the rutted route. The horizon is dominated by the ruins of the Abbey of St. Bertin, the Basilique Notre-Dame and the Eglise St-Denis. The work can be dated to circa 1823-1824, a time when Bonington was often in Normandy, exploring its coastline and interior. The work is executed in sepia washes, a medium which, in the 1820s, was very popular amongst French collectors. It shows Bonington’s confident handling of watercolor, particularly in the sky, where his use of the ‘wet-on-wet’ technique allows him to convey perfectly the atmospheric effects of the weather.

In the Tate Britain, London, there is an oil painting by Bonington of St.Omer.1 It shows the town from the same viewpoint but with a different composition in the foreground. Patrick Noon has suggested that although there is a connection between this oil and the present watercolor, both were conceived as finished, presentation, works.

The first owner of this sheet was probably Lewis Brown, a 'Bordeaux wine merchant of British nationality… who amassed a large collection of Bonington’s watercolours in the 1820s'.2 Another important early owner was Le Comte de Faucigny. He was a member of a Swiss banking family who played an important role in the restoration of the Bourbons to the French throne. In 1824 he married the illegitimate daughter of the Duc de Berry and the English actress Amy Brown, however in 1830, he was forced to flee to England after the July revolution. He owned a number of works by Bonington including the watercolor Fishing Boats Aground (New Haven, Yale Center for British Art) and the oil Coastal Landscape (Location unknown).3

1. P. Noon, Richard Parkes Bonington ‘On the Pleasure of Painting,' New Haven 1992, p. 112, no. 26

2. P. Noon, Richard Parkes Bonington, the complete paintings, New Haven 2008, p. 88

3. Ibid., nos. 92 and 182

The Line of Beauty: Drawings from the Collection of Howard and Saretta Barnet

|
New York