436
436

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR, SOUTH CAROLINA

Jean Béraud
JEUNE FEMME, PLACE DE LA CONCORDE
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 312,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
436

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR, SOUTH CAROLINA

Jean Béraud
JEUNE FEMME, PLACE DE LA CONCORDE
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 312,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Jean Béraud
1849 - 1935
JEUNE FEMME, PLACE DE LA CONCORDE
Signed Jean Béraud (lower right)
Oil on panel
21 5/8 by 14 7/8 in.
54.9 by 37.8 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Madeline Cutting Hibbs, Pittsfield, Massachusetts
Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts (and sold: Christie's, New York, February 12, 1998, lot 61)
Richard Green Fine Paintings, Ltd., London
Acquired from the above in 2001

Literature

Patrick Offenstadt, Jean Béraud 1849-1935, The Belle Époque: A Dream of Times Gone By, catalogue raisonné, Cologne, 1999, no. 100, illustrated p. 131

Catalogue Note

In this arresting and elegant composition, Jean Béraud captures the spirit of the Place de la Concorde (see fig. 1), where a young woman sends a sphinxlike gaze towards the viewer. Her fashionable ensemble cuts a sharp line against the atmospheric square behind her; looking south towards the Palais Bourbon, the spires of the Basilique Sainte-Clothilde are suggested at left and the gates the Champs Elysées at right. While the Place de la Concorde was once the gruesome home of the guillotine and the location of Marie Antoinette’s beheading (among countless others), Béraud celebrates the modern public space, where seeing and being seen is an extravagant sport, which lends the streets of Paris their electrifying joie-de-vivre.

Béraud’s paintings are synonymous with the Belle Époque, so much so that at the turn of the century any painted scene of Parisian life came to be known as a ‘Béraud.’ He adored the city, in all weathers, at any time of day or night, indoors or out, and above all loved its people, whether the aristocracy and upper middle classes, the bourgeoisie, or the working people. A pupil of Léon Bonnat, Béraud’s rigorous draftsmanship owes something to this academic training, but his choice of subjects was far from that of the Academics such as William Bouguereau, Georges Jules Victor Clairin and Charles Gleyre. In graphic, spare works such as this, it is clear that Béraud’s elegant realism owed something to the new art of photography pioneered by Nicéphore Niépce, Louis Daguerre, and Henry Fox Talbot.

Béraud embraced the world of fashion and celebrated the art of dress. He took great pleasure in detailing the elaborate costumes of Parisiennes during the Belle Époque, and the shops of the rue de la Paix, including the famous Maison Doucet and Maison Paquin. Indeed, both the men and women of Paris knew that public life required them to be on display, and they shopped and dressed with that mind.


Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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