429
429

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTION

Odilon Redon
CENTAURES
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Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 411,000 USD
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429

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTION

Odilon Redon
CENTAURES
Estimate
Irrevocable Bids
Lots with this symbol indicate that a party has provided Sotheby’s with an irrevocable bid on the lot that will be executed during the sale at a value that ensures that the lot will sell. The irrevocable bidder, who may bid in excess of the irrevocable bid, will be compensated based on the final hammer price in the event he or she is not the successful bidder or may receive a fixed fee in the event he or she is the successful bidder. If the irrevocable bidder is the successful bidder, the fixed fee (if applicable) for providing the irrevocable bid may be netted against the irrevocable bidder’s obligation to pay the full purchase price for the lot and the purchase price reported for the lot shall be net of such fixed fee. If the irrevocable bid is not secured until after the printing of the auction catalogue, a pre-lot announcement will be made indicating that there is an irrevocable bid on the lot. If the irrevocable bidder is advising anyone with respect to the lot, Sotheby’s requires the irrevocable bidder to disclose his or her financial interest in the lot. If an agent is advising you or bidding on your behalf with respect to a lot identified as being subject to an irrevocable bid, you should request that the agent disclose whether or not he or she has a financial interest in the lot.
Guaranteed Property
Guaranteed Property. The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price from one auction or a series of auctions. If every lot in a catalogue is guaranteed, the Conditions of Sale will so state and this symbol will not be used for each lot.
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 411,000 USD
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Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Odilon Redon
1840 - 1916
CENTAURES
Signed Odilon Redon (lower right)
Oil on panel
11 7/8 by 10 5/8 in.
30 by 27 cm
Painted circa 1910. 
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Provenance

Durand-Ruel, Paris
Private Collection, France
Sale: Palais Galliera, Paris, December 8, 1971, lot 85
Sale: Christie's, London, June 24, 1986, lot 105
Sale: Christie's, New York, May 11, 1988, lot 24
Richard L. Feigen & Co., New York
Private Collection, New York (and sold: Sotheby's, London, June 27, 2001, lot 111)
Acquired at the above sale 

Exhibited

New York, Dia Foundation, Art Against AIDS, 1987, no. 88, illustrated in color in the catalogue

Literature

World Collectors Annuary, vol. XXIII, Delft, 1971
Alec Wildenstein, Odilon Redon, Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre peint et dessinéMythes et légendes, vol. II, Paris, 1994, no. 1244, illustrated p. 266 

Catalogue Note

After several high-profile commissions for decorative works and society portraits, Redon experienced a renewed confidence in his creativity that resulted in a liberation through color. The paintings from his late period, such as the present work, symbolize a personal victory and a blossoming of his art. While the centaur had been a motif Redon used throughout his career, never before had he painted with such vibrant jewel tones and shimmering texture (see fig. 1). In describing the evolution of his work, Marius-Ary Leblond wrote: "(He) felt the need for light (and) climbed toward color as if toward Paradise... He lifted himself up... achieving...a tender and radiant outpouring of glorious color" (quoted in Odilon Redon: Prince of Dreams (exhibition catalogue), Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago & traveling, 1994-95, p. 333). 

Redon proved to be an inspiration for many younger artists, including members of the Nabis group, Henri Matisse and even Marcel Duchamp. Richard Hobbs discusses the interest in Redon shown by the Nabis: “What the Nabis actually so admired in Redon was not only the technical quality of his works but also his ability to suggest the mysterious and the spiritual. Pierre Bonnard later summed this up succinctly: "What strikes me most in his work is the coming together of two almost opposite qualities: very pure plastic substance and very mysterious expression. Our whole generation is under his charm and benefits from his advice'" (Richard Hobbs, Odilon Redon, London, 1977, p. 84). After his revolutionary showing of Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 at the 1913 Armory Show (where 38 of Redon’s works were also exhibited), Marcel Duchamp was asked whether his art or that of his contemporaries was derived from the legacy of Cézanne. He replied, "I am sure that most of my friends would say so and I know that [Cézanne] is a great man. Nevertheless, if I am to tell what my own point of departure has been, I should say that it was the art of Odilon Redon” (quoted in John Rewald, “Odilon Redon,” in Odilon Redon, Gustave Moreau, Rodolphe Bresdin (exhibition catalogue), The Museum of Modern Art, New York & Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, 1961-62, p. 44).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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